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Squills 3/11/19 - 3/17/19



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Mon Mar 18, 2019 4:51 am
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Welcome to Squills, the official news bulletin of the Young Writers Society!
What will you find here? Tons of interesting news about YWS, including but not limited to: articles about writing, art, and the world of humanities; interviews with YWS members; shameless plugs; link round-ups; and opinionated columns.
And where will all of this come from? Take a look at our fantastic creative staff!

CREATIVE STAFF

Spoiler! :


Editor-in-Chief
Aley

General Editors
EternalRain
fraey
LadyBird

Friendly Neighborhood Robot
SquillsBot

Literary Reporter
LadyBird

Community Reporter
TheWeirdoFromBeyond
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ShadowVyper

Poetry Enchantress
Aley
alliyah

Resources Reporter
BiscuitsLeGuin

Storybooks Status Reporter
fraey

Writer's World Columnist
elysian

Anime Maniac
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Social Correspondent
EternalRain

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Available - PM Squillsbot if interested

General Reporters
Clarity
CloudKid

Ghost Reporter
shaniac



Of course, our content can’t come only from our staff. We also depend on you to help keep Squills successful. You’re all a part of a writing community, after all. If you’re interested in submitting to Squills, pop on over to the Reader’s Corner to find out how you can get involved by contributing an article or participating in other Squills activities.

You can apply to become a Squillian Journalist by submitting a sample article to SquillsBot today!

Well, that’s all I have for now. So, what are you waiting for? Enjoy!





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Mon Mar 18, 2019 4:53 am
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WHY NAPO? BLUEWATERLILY
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written by alliyah < PM: >

You likely saw that the NaPo threads are starting to get posted as people begin the count-down to National Poetry Month this April. Last week, we started the Why NaPo? series, and this week we continue with a new interview. The "Why NaPo?" series will follow a different poet every week in March, and find out the different reasons why people tackle NaPo, and what their experience has been. This week I was able to interview @bluewaterlily, a talented YWS user who has tackled NaPo three times. Here's what she had to say:

alliyah: Hi bluewaterlily, thanks for agreeing to the interview! So let's get started! Last year you did the NaPo completion challenge, do you have any goals for NaPo this year?


bluewaterlily: My first goal is to finish NaPo. I have done NaPo for the past three years and have finished my 2016 and 2018 challenges, so I would like to do that again. As far as goals, I think one goal is learning to become more aware of the rhythm or music of my poetry, which really boils down to where the line breaks land. I’d love to actually figure out how to choose decisive line breaks.

I’m also interested in exploring the more narrative side of poetry. I tend to write abstract poetry, so maybe taking a more personal approach this year and incorporating more narrative aspects into my poems, especially to give it more of a slam poetry vibe. I’ve been learning too ground my poetry in more narrative and getting more personal with using things that have happened in my life or the lives of others around me as inspiration. I actually have a poem that I have been trying to write for three years and it’s very personal and I’ve never been quite sure how to actually write it out, so that will probably be a major NaPo goal this year, especially since my NaPo thread theme kind of hinges on the premise of this poem. Oh and another goal: writing a happy poem. Most of my poems are raw, gritty, or angsty in some way. So yeah, writing at least one happy, hopeful, or inspiring poem.


a: It sounds like you have some nice specific goals, best of luck on achieving them this year! What do you think is the most challenging part of NaPo?


b: I think the most challenging part of NaPo is being satisfied with what you write. You would think it’d be finding inspiration, but I think writers feed off of the creative energy of those around them, and that’s one of my favorite things of NaPo being inspired by poetry that’s published but also the poetry of amazing poets on YWS and getting to be in the write-ins and writing alongside so many great poets in real time. But the hard part maybe for me anyway is to be happy with what I wrote. I can go to bed being satisfied with what I wrote and wake up hating it.

a: Do you have a favorite poem from your last year's NaPo project?


b: I don’t think I actually had a favorite poem. There were a few poems that stood out, but it is hard to pick a favorite one for some reason. I do have a few lines that I remember like “Love is just a potion that shrinks you down into a size it can handle” and “my heart is a revolving door always swinging between o p e n and closed” and “heartbreak is the moment before collision when you see the headlights and know the outcome.”

a: Those are all beautiful lines. Last question, would you encourage people to try NaPo if they haven't before and why? And any first time NaPo writers?


b: I would encourage anyone to write poetry and take part in NaPo. It’s honestly a magical time of year and a great way to grow as a writer and maybe even to grow as a person. Writing has always been a creative outlet for me, and poetry has always been an emotional outlet. To me, Maya Angelou sums up being a writer or poet when she said, “There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside of you.” Poetry can be a chance to tell that story, but the stakes aren’t always that high. It can just be a chance to have fun and try something new as a writer. I say when in doubt, do NaPo anyway. I don’t think you’ll regret it.

To cultivate inspiration, read poetry. Collaborate. Be engaged. Do NaPo with friends. Read other people’s threads to see what they’re doing and comment on people’s threads. Listen to your favorite music. Find prompts. Take some time to sit down alone and just write or brainstorm. You’ll find inspiration in the most surprising places. And if you can’t write thirty poems, it’s okay. Just do what you feel like doing or what you’re capable of. Whatever the outcome, be proud of yourself for doing it and for what you create. Regardless of how you feel about what you wrote or how much you wrote, it’s an accomplishment.


Thanks for your answers bluewaterlily! Just to highlight some of what she said, I think bluewaterlily did a great job of showing that the value of NaPo isn't just writing 30 poems, but that for many poets they form personal goals to test different poetic strengths and techniques. She also gave some great tips at the end of the interview about keeping positive and appreciating what you're able to produce. Being in a collaborative community with jams and workshops hopefully helps that aspect of positivity! I'll post the links to bluewaterlily's NaPo threads below, so that you can check out some of the work she's done. I personally love her distinctive poetic voice and ability to really pull out some vivid unique imagery.

bluewaterlily's NaPo threads
to bend shadows into light - 2019
insipid kisses and other midnight musings - 2018
the girl with the origami heart - 2017
to skip stones on the ocean - 2016

Thanks for reading, watch out for our new interview next week. And remember, you can join the conversation with your reasons for doing NaPo on your wall with the hashtag #WhyNaPo.





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Mon Mar 18, 2019 4:56 am
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STORYBOOK COVERAGE - MARCH
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written by fraey < PM: >

Hello, readers to another update on SBs! We've got an interesting blend of Official-looking ones, reboots, and more!

First off, is our very own Official Crew Storybook for March: Bluebell's Spring by @Magestorrow

- This is going to be realistic/modern world setting, filled with possibilities and new friends to meet. Check this out if a down-to-earth small-town feel complete with a lovely park is more your style, as this is labeled as a "slice-of-life" for those in knowing more anime/manga genres. There will be plenty of chances to get to know other characters, and really get immersed in suburban Bluebell.

Next is up is another Official Crew Storybook, but from January:
In Service to the Hierophant by @AstralHunter

- In this SB, you will become a character, as a Watcher, in the unique land of Kalandrel, where golem summoning is still happening and is truly an awing event to observe. With so many different ideas to choose from, and a chance to not be as human as one may think, this story holds so many different possibilities, while of course, swearing to serve your leader, the hierophant. Head over to that link above if controlling golems sounds interesting.

If interested in playing a made-up celebrity, check this SB out:
FAME by @DivinePrincess

- To be a part of this story, create your very own celebrity, to then live life and learn just how being famous can affect your personality and your own actions. Seeking to learn more about popularity having an effect on one's self, and possibly lead to erroneous ways? This is the place to do it.

The following is a reboot of a past SB, as a sort of prequel:
When the World Starts Dying by @Basil

- Playing on the ideas of an apocalypse set off by a mysterious disease, this SB takes place in the last place still somewhat functioning: England. It's been six months since the first wave of death and you're hanging in there, trying to stay away from the zombie-like beings dubbed the Infected, and not starving to death. If you've always been interested in fighting zombies in the UK, here is your chance.

Another kind of fantasy-ish SB is:
The Watchers by @AmadeusW

- Interestingly enough, in this SB, you will also be playing as a member of the Watchers, however, in this case, you're going to be fighting against a powerful demon and his army. In addition, this SB takes place in Brussels, Belgium, and gives all of its users the role of saving their people and protecting another special group of magicians from being enslaved. High stakes! Powers! Demons! Check this out if any of those characteristics sound neat.

Last but not least, we have:
Closer: a Forensics Investigation by @zaminami

- This SB kicks off in a spectacular way - a murder in a small town! You get to help solve this case, working along your fellow members of different positions to better further the investigation. But that's not all! Once eventually solving the case, (as one hopes they can eventually) your next job will be the trial itself, gathering enough evidence to possibly press charges to keep the murderer in police custody. Good luck investigators!





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QUEER VOICES: A JOURNEY TO STORIES WORTH TELLING VOLUME THREE
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written by Cloudkid< PM: >

When I was first beginning my gender journey, a book that immensely helped me is Parrotfish by Ellen Wittlinger. It centers around a sixteen year old boy coming out as transgender to his family and friends, and details his journey and experience in dealing with that ordeal.

The other day, in preparation of writing this review, I picked up the book and leafed through it. It made me cringe. It has a lot of outdated terms in it - the word transgendered, which is incorrect, transsexuality, which is a very outdated term no longer in use, and even a slur. The author of the book herself wrote an article about these outdated terms, and has since had an updated version of the book re-released. You can read that article here .

However, back in the era of which I read this book - it was written in 2005, published in 2007, and I read it circa 2012 - it didn't matter really what language was used to discuss trans people because trans people weren't known of. Reading this book showed me that what I felt was acceptable. That there was a name for it, that I wasn't alone, and most importantly to me, that I had a solution. That it was okay to feel like my gender, the one that had been assigned to me at birth, wasn't right for me.

The characters are well rounded and the book itself is realistic. It shows all types of reactions one can get when coming out, from an unsupportive friend to family members that struggle but try. It is a holistic look at what a young man goes through when first discovering his trans identity.

If you are questioning your identity or just starting to get into the world of trans, I recommend this book to you. It's a great introductory book with a wholesome story. It was definitely a refuge for me when I first started questioning who I was, and hopefully it can be the same to you.





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Mon Mar 18, 2019 4:57 am
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SOME SUPER SERIOUS BUSINESS
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Written by LadyBird < PM: >

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A SWEET HISTORY: PIE
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written by EternalRain < PM: >

In honor of Pi Day (3/14) that passed this past week, I decided to dive into the origins of pie. Specifically, when I refer to pie I mean “American” pie, i.e. a classic apple or pumpkin pie that may be served at Thanksgiving (pictured above). Don’t fear, though, if you’re non-American, because it’s not all centered around America!

Historians actually trace pie’s origins back to the Ancient Egyptians in 6000 BC. These pies were much different from the “classic American pie”; they were made of oats, barley, and rye and filled with honey. However, as different as they are, they both share the commonality of some sort of grain encompasses a sweeter thing.

From the Ancient Egyptians, the Greeks carried on this recipe and created pie pastry from flour and water. This was passed to the Romans, and they filled their pies with meats, approaching the savory side of pies. One of their first recipes, however, was a goat cheese and honey pie, which (in my cheese-loving opinion) sound very good.

Meat pies became very predominant in England and were commonly made out of fowl. And then, around the 1500s in England, fruit pies came about. Pie was a specialty among women in England; both fruit and meat (some common meat pies today are shepherd’s pie and cottage pie).

Pie came to America when the first settlers arrived, and it has been an American tradition ever since. But why is pie so predominant in American culture? Pioneer women served pie at nearly every meal, and with food the center of gatherings and family culture, soon pies were the biggest thing at food contests and picnics.

So, pies, once a common English dish, are now seen as one of America’s classic desserts.

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(picture from Betty Crocker Apple Pie Recipe





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THIS MONTH IN HISTORY: MARCH
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written by alliyah < PM: >

Ready for another trip down memory lane - let's see what was happening in March two, five, and ten years ago!

TWO YEARS AGO: YWS March, 2017

Featured Members
March featured 2 great users! Beginning the month, @GoldenQuill was featured - she's been a long time member of YWS who actually joined in 2009 and made a mark in the reviewing world on the site! The next featured member was @EternalRain, who now wears a green username as part of the General Lit junior moderator team. Rain is involved in many aspects all around the site though, and is also actually one the editors here at Squills - and in March of 2017 she was also the winner of the R.E.D. contest for those who remember. Here's the original announcements: GoldenQuill & EternalRain.

Classic Squills
So while I was trying to find something else to highlight from March 2017, I looked through the March Squills editions and ran into this Chicken Appreciation Post by @Kaylaa. I have no explanation for why it exists, but had a laugh wondering if somehow it is connected to the modern Egg conspiracy posted by @fishsashimi (by the way go click that egg and give it a "like" if you haven't already - it's in the running for most liked post of all times having 51 likes at the time this article is being written. Whatever the connection between the chicken and the egg it is clear at least in this instance that the chicken certainly came first.

FIVE YEARS AGO: YWS March, 2014

Featured Members
There was some sort of color theme for the featured members of March 2014 - they were @GoldFlame and @Magenta! Both were avid reviewers and also active on the forums side of the site. Here's the original Featured Member Interviews: GoldFlame & Magenta.

Last Man Standing - STILL STANDING
This is very neat - I believe that The "Last Man Standing Contest" hosted by @Tenyo originally started back in March 2014.That's pretty neat that after all this time there's still LMS contests going on. Here's one of the original Squills articles about the challenge from back in 2014, written by @BlueAfrica - The Last Man Standing .

TEN YEARS AGO: YWS March, 2009

Featured Members
As mentioned in the last edition of This Month in History: February @Rosendorn had a reign of Featured Member for several months in 2009, including March.

Featured Work
I browsed through a few of the featured works from March 2009, and noticed @Threnody's poetry accounted for quite a few. On March 9th for instance they had 3 featured poems all in one day. Here's one from that time period: "Coffee".

There's our March findings! Take a look in your YWS scrapbook and see if you can dig up anything from April 2009, 2014, or 2017 for our next issue. I have a feeling that it might just involve a little poetry.





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LET'S TALK SCIENCE: DISCUSSION TIME
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Written by LadyBird < PM: >

Questions and Answers:
1. What do reptiles and amphibians have in common?
A. They both have gills.
B. They both lay eggs.
C. They both grow legs.

2. What animals belong to the order Testudines?
A. Turtles.
B. Crocodiles.
C. Snakes.

3. How old can a turtle become?
A. 10 years old
B. 50 years old and below
C. 100 years old or more

4. The Komodo dragon has [blank] that kills the animal that it bites.
A. Bacteria in its mouth
B. Venom in its teeth
C. Poisonous glands

5. Which order do manatees belong to?
A. Falconiformes
B. Decapoda
C. Sirenia


So there's a defect in the first question that I asked because there are exceptions to every overreaching idea that we present. And the fact that I forgot to add this into my wording is why I'm talking about it now. If I had thought about it I could have said, "What do *most* reptiles and amphibians have in common?"

Most reptiles and amphibians do lay some sort of egg as part of their reproductive processes. There are obviously some snakes who have live birth but for the most part reptiles have eggs. And for the most part, amphibians have eggs.

There's also an issue with choice C because I can think of plenty of amphibians that have legs and certainly plenty of reptiles that have legs. But then we also have a great deal of reptiles without legs.

This question has to deal in "overall" and "majority". I only realized the fault once I started working the problems out with another science person from the community and it's been bothering me to write it out since.

Simply said:
There are exceptions to the content that I put out about the nature of the differences between amphibians and reptiles. I aimed to fix that issue with this article. But now I am moving to talk about how this is a bigger issue.

-

In life (just generally), we tend to make overreaching assumptions about the details of any event. In life, we can brush these assumptions off and play it down to this concept just being a thing that humans tend to experience. Like assuming that you are always going to have a bad experience in this one grocery store based on this one interaction you had once upon a time.

That's just a thing we know happens. And we just live with that.

But when we come to talking about science and making big assumptions from little things the water is going to get very murky very quickly. The statement that I decided on when proposing this idea as an article is slightly based in agriculture (because ag science is my favorite thing) and it involves a few components.

All oranges (the fruit) are orange (the standard color).


The vision of orange might differe but let's just say the standard color of orange for the general example of an orange is this shade:
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We can say that oranges are generally going to be some shade of orange that is near this shade. We're probably not going to have a piece of fruit that's a murky brown orange, almost like a brick on the side of a building. (If you find a piece of fruit in that shade, please don't eat it. That's a lesson for another time.)

But depending on all of the infinite possibilities that work into the quality of the piece of fruit you pick up in a grocery store, we actually can't say *all* oranges are that general shade of orange. Many bags are likely to have pieces that are more of a yellow, having enough of a degree of yellow to call it a yellow shade.

Realistically speaking, probably less than half of the oranges we see in produce are in that generalized shade of orange. Something like lemons is more likely to be the generalized shade of yellow we associate with lemons but again, a topic for another time.

Yes, you are making an observation about the color of this orange that you are looking at currently.
And yes, you are continuing to associate this shade of this orange with the general shade of orange associated with this type of citrus.
But it really shouldn't reach any farther than this point.


This comes back to a general advisement from science courses everywhere.
"Please don't make assumptions based on observations."

Remember that, kids.

Please.

-

Final shout out to @ShadowVyper and @Tuckster for answering my science trivia.

This is the question that I present this week based on something I heard elsewhere. [It came from Hank Green and he was rambling over it for those whole 4 minutes and it's stuck with me for awhile.]
It's not really trivia. It's more of an open discussion that I want Squills subscriber responses for.

What is the strongest force on Earth/earth?


The somewhat common tumblr post that Hank is talking about in this video has been passed around in a lot of forms.

I'm putting this out for discussion to all of my science peeps that might be lurking in the YWS abyss and I look forward to your answers, comments, questions and concerns.





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POETRY PERSPECTIVE: THE SUSPICIOUS READER - PART 3
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written by alliyah < PM: >

Two weeks ago I brought up this concept on YWS I've been noticing of the "Suspicious Reader" , the type of poetry reader who assumes there are all of these unsaid rules about poetry and that anything that breaks convention is an unintentional mistake rather than the author's carefully intended decision. Last week I gave a few pointers on how to write with Suspicious Readers in mind , and this week... we're tackling the question - what if I'm the Suspicious Reader?

First, have no fear! I'm going to make this as painless as possible, and give you a few tips (notice, I did not say rules) about poetic interpretation. And second, keep an open mind - poetry is for the people, you're allowed to have an opinion, and you're allowed to disagree with me - poetry doesn't have hard and fast rules, but techniques that effect, help, and hinder poetic communication. You are allowed to disagree with me - but I'll ask you to hear me out first.

Poetry: Rules? No Rules?
The first mental hurdle to get through is to tackle this question. Does poetry have rules, or does it not? Well yes, and no. Structured Poetry (poetry that follows specific forms) often has ancient handed down conventions for syllables, meter, rhyme and line-count. You could consider these rules. Although you'll find that poets will often shift them a bit to have effect - in which case they are intentionally breaking the rule for some purpose.

Free-verse poetry on the other hand, does not have rules. To imply that there are some sort of official rules that someone has gotten to decide - is a form of elitist gate-keeping. Slam poetry and anti-poetry are both examples of poetry that originally came about specifically with the intent to challenge the idea that a poem must look or sound a certain way or follow specific conventions. Even though free-verse poetry does not have rules, there are still things that tend to make it "better or worse" at communicating and being enjoyed. In my opinion a poetry critique needs to be handled more like experiencing art, than checking a math problem. Evaluate how the poetic techniques led to your interpretation and experience of the poem, rather than going searching for rules that were observed or broken. Below I'm going to quickly go over some of the most common places people appeal to "rules" and show how you can shift your thinking towards evaluating "effect" rather than "rules".

Capitalization
I admit, when I began as a poetry reviewer on YWS, I was one of those people that went around commenting "you need to capitalize your 'i's". Why did I do that? Because I thought it was jarring, juvenile, and incorrect to do other-wise. Then I ran across a few published poets that through punctuation out the window, I was intrigued! Who let them do this?

Here's the deal reader, there is no formal rule that a poet must capitalize anything in a free-verse poem, not states, not proper-names, not "i's", not even "God" if they don't feel like it. However, that doesn't mean that capitalization doesn't matter in a poem, or that it is off limits for commenting. The important shift is that the comment should come from what effect the capitalization choices have on your reading rather than pretending to cite some imaginary poetry rule-book. If as a young poetry reviewer I had said, "I find it jarring to read "i's" lower-cased, because I'm used to reading them capitalized, and was taught to capitalize them in school." that would have been a great comment drawing from what effect the poetry had on me, rather than misinforming them "you have to capitalize 'i'" which wasn't letting the poet know anything.

Productive Feedback :
So reader, if you find lack of capitalization confusing, annoying, or strange - you are totally allowed to say that, but try telling the poet why you have that impression. You never know, it could be the case that the poet actually wants you to feel that way. Also know that there is a strong tradition of modern free-verse poets who have broken away from the conventional rules of capitalization. Another quick note, that just because I gave a lot of time to lack of capitalization, doesn't mean poets have to give up capitalization either - it's all about intended effect!

Here's @Aley's take on the different effects of Capitalization in Poetry . I also found a few choice words from Poetry Crew Leader, @PenguinAttack in the Squills Archives if you need more convincing on this matter. YWS Mythbusting: Capitalization .

Punctuation
Who knew that unconventional punctuation choices, could. have? so much; controversy...

As illustrated in that strangely punctuated intro sentence, punctuation absolutely matters in prose, articles, and even in poetry - but not because some rule book said it does, but because it effects how we read and interpret what is written. If you've taken a peak at the Poetry Knowledge Base you'll actually notice that there are five articles that take up this issue of poetic punctuation. Some advocate for more formal punctuation, some advocate for looser rules, and some say it really depends. I'm going to go with that last camp. Sometimes punctuating every phrase, in a way that is consistent with common grammatical prose standards is desirable, because it communicates that one should read the poem in prose-like, or possibly a narrative way. However! (do you see what I did there?) sometimes, it can be instrumental to play with punctuation a little, either to effect the flow of the piece or how it's understood.

So if there aren't punctuation rules in poetry, can I comment on punctuation in reviews?
Of course! It's part of your interpretation after-all. But I would recommend to try to phrase your critique or praise about the effect the punctuation had on your reading, rather than basing your critique off of "don't do this, because it's not proper or against the rules".

Productive Feedback :
"Your poem's punctuation...."
Hindered/Assisted the flow of the piece, Was distracting, Communicated a formal speaker, Communicated an informal speaker, Didn't seem to fit the logical flow of the narrative, Helped me break up thoughts, Made the phrases blend together, Created a lot of breaks in my reading, Seemed overly dramatic, Seemed understated, Was inconsistent throughout.

Aley has created a really great article that goes into detail on some of the different effects different punctuation choices make in a poem. It's great for both reviewers and writers. Punctuation in Poetry .

You can also apply what's been said about capitalization and punctuation to different poetic issues you run into too, like spelling, long line-lenghths, skips in rhyme scheme - always go back to, "what is the effect?".

Forms
You'll remember at the beginning I mentioned that certain types of poetry do have rules! For the Suspicious Poetry Reader, this poetry might really appeal to you, because here is where you can still appeal to the rules in your critiques. Some things to note when you find a structured poem.

1) It can be really helpful to look-up what type of poem structure they're using, so you can see if the follow or break the regular structure. If you aren't sure, it's alright to ask! I have wrongly assumed someone was breaking a rhyme scheme, because I missed that they were using a more complicated rhyme scheme pattern than I was used to. There are a lot of poetic forms out there, so it's always good to double check.

2) Even if you aren't quite sure how to evaluate the poem's rhyme scheme, meter, or syllable count, there is an abundance of feedback that you can give without any poetry training or familiarity with the form. Like interpretation! This is always useful for the poet (at least in my opinion) so when in doubt, try to give your interpretation - even if you don't get what the poet was going for, that can be very helpful for the poet to know that there message isn't being communicated clearly.

Lastly, if you need some help on structures, I'm going to direct you to our Knowledge Base Index of Poetic Structures there's some really helpful material there. A side-Resources-plug, if you are really good at a few structures and you don't see an article about them in the Knowledge Base, why not consider writing an article about it and submitting to the Resources Crew for consideration?

Closing
Now the main take-aways in this article are 1) Free-Verse poetry does not have rules. 2) Just because poetry doesn't have rules, doesn't mean that certain conventions are unimportant. 3) Rather than appealing to rules in reviews, try commenting on effect or interpretation.

That closes up this series of Poetic Perspectives, but if you'd like to dialogue more on this issue or any of my articles, feel free to stop by my Author's Page over in the Squills Fan Club. I'd love to hear from you.





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SHAMELESS PLUGS
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written by SquillsBot < PM: >

We love to run articles and questions, but we also love to advertise for you. Let people know about your new blog, a poem or story you’re looking for reviews on, or a forum thread you’d like more traffic on through Squills’ Shameless Plugs. PM @SquillsBot with the exact formatting of your advertisement, contained in the following code.

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Place advertisement here. Make sure you include a title!

And now for this week's Shameless Plugs!



Review Rampage

Do you like competitions? Do you like easy ways to make extra points? Then read on!

The #ReviewRampage is a competition hosted by @ShadowVyper and @Kirkiln that is a Go-At-Your-Own-Pace review challenge. You set your own review goals and wagers, then race against time to see if you can get done in time. Or, for the more competitive spirits out there, you can also duel against your fellow Rampagers.

Go check out the Q&A Forum for more information and then head on over to the Entry Forum to claim your place as a Rampager.

Get your Rampage on!


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Want to be a part of Squills, the YWS newsletter? Perfect! We want you. You can find more information here, and you can apply now by sending a sample article to SquillsBot's PM.

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fishsashimi welcomes you to the YWS Hunger Games Simulator! Have some fun and win some prizes! PM @fishsashimi with any questions you may have.

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Calling All Knights of the Green Room!


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Our Building Permit for completing Challenge Four: Restoring the Library expires May 2019. The Commander is requesting all available Knights to head to the Green Room to help. To find out more, check out the Commander's post in the Great Hall .

- The Commander

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Do YOU want to join
the Knights of the Green Room?


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The Knights of the Green Room are looking for some new recruits!

If you enjoy reviewing this may be the group for you!

For more information: KotGR Information
To declare you interest: Declare in the Great Hall .
If you have questions: Send a PM to Lieutenant Lizz (@LadyBird) or Knight Alliyah (@alliyah).


That's all folks~ Now send us yours.





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Gender: None specified
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Mon Mar 18, 2019 5:08 am
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SquillsBot says...



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written by SquillsBot < PM: >

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In short, Mrs. Pontellier was beginning to realize her position in the universe as a human being, and to recognize her relations as an individual to the world within and about her.
— Kate Chopin, The Awakening