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Chrissy's Bio for Work

by PickledChrissy


Note: This is a bio I wrote for work. I'm taking out all the information that is private and replacing with Classified. Also, just so you can put this in context, it is a family owned and managed company and I grew up in the trade.

It is hard to pin down the exact point in time when I began to work for Classified. By the time I was twelve, I was already doing small jobs around the office. It was by no means a steady job, but I was learning.

In 2015, my father said a very strange thing to me. Out of the blue, and completely at random, he said: “Build Classified a new website.”

It was more than a bit of a shock. For the briefest moment, all I felt was terror. How do you build a website? I was raised to believe that can't should not be a part of anyone's vocabulary, but even so, it was terrifying to hear myself respond: “okay.”

I graduated when I was fifteen, and with school behind me, I dedicated all my time to building the website. The day when the lines of HTML began to make sense remains one of my favorite memories. Since then, I have learned to recognize a strange beauty in the HTML that rivals that of a completed Calculus equation. It is a pleasure that remains strictly my own; there are few who can see it.

Now, years later, I handle all of the technical work and a good portion of the marketing. I supervise the website, and handle the newsletter; the onboarding procedure is mine to maintain, as is the PBX system, and the list goes on seemingly into infinity.

Outside of work, my hobbies are simple and few in number. I enjoy music, having played the piano for many years, and I am also beginning to learn the violin, much to my family's chagrin. Reading is another love of mine. History is filled with beauty, and the more I study it, the more I realize how much I do not know.

But where my passion truly lies is in writing. There is a strange pleasure and thrill to be found in the action of putting words to paper. Sorrow can be there, and joy; love and heartbreak. I put what free time I have into writing the many stories that exist nowhere but in my head.

My unrealized ambition is to be a published author. It is a lot, but I have my whole life ahead. There is time enough there, I hope, to accomplish my dreams. But the clock is ticking. 


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Thu Feb 14, 2019 3:40 am
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alliyah wrote a review...



Hi Chrissy, this seems like a pretty straightforward biographical statement - so I'll just be giving a few critiques/suggestions

It would help if you said more about what type of purpose this statement serves - will it just be posted on the company website? Are you trying to seem professional? Fun? Unique? Would you recycle it for a job application in the future? Those sorts of things might help determine the content. Do you want the reader to be interested in the business or know you better?

Without knowing it that it's really hard to know how to critique it.

I'd say you took a somewhat casual and fun tone to your biography - it's not what I would put on a job application, and it does meander quite a bit, but you do portray your role at the company positively, and the reader knows more about you by reading this piece.


A few critiques:

"It is hard to pin down the exact point in time when I began to work for Classified. By the time I was twelve, I was already doing small jobs around the office. It was by no means a steady job, but I was learning."

-> depending on where you live and what your family company does, I think this could be interpreted in a negative light.
In many states/countries child-labor is illegal - so implying that you were working without pay at a young age, could give the wrong message about your company, and even potentially create legal questions for potential customers. I think rephrasing to say, you'd grown up around the business and were quickly involved, might be a better route - just watch your phrasing here.

In 2015, my father said a very strange thing to me. Out of the blue, and completely at random, he said: “Build Classified a new website.”


Interesting, I think it's a good choice to include a bit about your family since that's your tie to the company and people love family ran businesses. Having both "out of the blue" and "at random" is redundant -> they mean the same thing, so you only need one.

I was raised to believe that can't should not be a part of anyone's vocabulary, but even so, it was terrifying to hear myself respond: “okay.”


-> This part seemed a bit hyped up, why did you feel so scared about it? Were you afraid of failing, afraid of the internet, what stirred up these fears? -

You should also put "can't" in quotation marks - to avoid it being a double-negative.

I graduated when I was fifteen, and with school behind me, I dedicated all my time to building the website.


You graduated at fifteen that's awesome! Not many people do that! That is worth highlighting even more! Did you really dedicate all of your time to the website building though? Be careful not to exaggerate.

Since then, I have learned to recognize a strange beauty in the HTML that rivals that of a completed Calculus equation. It is a pleasure that remains strictly my own; there are few who can see it.

Now, years later, I handle all of the technical work and a good portion of the marketing. I supervise the website, and handle the newsletter; the onboarding procedure is mine to maintain, as is the PBX system, and the list goes on seemingly into infinity.


-> I liked this! Showed so much growth from when you first started out. And shows your dedication.

Outside of work, my hobbies are simple and few in number.


"simple" has the connotation of "easy" -> so I think I'd pick a different word, you don't want to sell yourself short in a biography, there's really no reason to.

But where my passion truly lies is in writing. There is a strange pleasure and thrill to be found in the action of putting words to paper. Sorrow can be there, and joy; love and heartbreak. I put what free time I have into writing the many stories that exist nowhere but in my head.

My unrealized ambition is to be a published author. It is a lot, but I have my whole life ahead. There is time enough there, I hope, to accomplish my dreams. But the clock is ticking


To be honest the section about writing was interesting, but felt very over-dramatic. I mean if that's your personality I think that's probably fine, but to me it just came off as dramatic to the point of almost sounding fake? Like "the clock is ticking" part especially, I was just like, wait isn't the author an 18 year old? huh?! I would think unless the company sells products marketed to children, most of the readers will be way over 18, so reading about an 18 year old who believes "the clock is ticking" might be off-putting. I think writing about your determination and passion is really great to show your personality though.

That's all I had! Writing autobiographical information can be super difficult, and I think you did a nice job of portraying yourself as a real person with an interesting life-story and interests.

~alliyah






Thanks for the review! I'm especially grateful for your pointing out the need to be careful when describing how I started working in the company. I've been in it so long, it never really occurred to me. Also, I will be sure to tone down the rhetoric in the last part. In my defense though, I do try to think of time as a ticking clock and every moment as a chance I will never have again, but I can see how that would be offsetting.
Thank you! :)



alliyah says...


You are very welcome! :)




"Who am I? I'm just a writer. I write things down. I walk through your dreams and invent the future."
— Richard Siken