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Mon Mar 10, 2014 4:28 am
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Welcome to Squills, the official news bulletin of the Young Writers Society!

What will you find here? Tons of interesting news about YWS, including but not limited to: articles about writing, art, and the world of humanities; interviews with YWS members; shameless plugs; link round-ups; and opinionated columns.

And where will all of this come from? Take a look at our fantastic creative staff!

CREATIVE STAFF


Spoiler! :
Editor-in-Chief
Iggy

General Editors
ShadowVyper
KnightTeen

Friendly Neighborhood Robot
SquillsBot

Friendly Neighborhood Cow
CowLogic

Literary Reporter
Available - PM SquillsBot if interested

Resources Reporter
Tenyo

Community Reporter
Sapi

Storybook Reporter
AfterTheStorm

Link Cowgirl
megsug

Poetry Enchantress
Clarity

The Adventurer
BlueAfrica

Quibbles Columnist
Aadygirl

Social Correspondent
Iggy

Associate of Pruno
Blackwood

Media Critic
Kanome

General Reporters
ArcticMonkey
Messenger
OliveDreams
whitewolfpuppy
BloodinkSeesFootage
Paracosm
SparkToFlame
NightWolf
Lucrezia

Past Editors-in-Chief
GriffinKeeper
AlfredSymon
Hannah


Of course, our content can’t come only from our staff. We also depend on you to help keep Squills successful. You’re all a part of a writing community, after all. If you’re interested in submitting to Squills, pop on over to the Reader’s Corner to find out how you can get involved by contributing an article or participating in other Squills activities.

Well, that’s all I have for now. So, what are you waiting for? Enjoy!
Last edited by SquillsBot on Mon Mar 10, 2014 4:30 am, edited 1 time in total.





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THE FIRST-EVER WRITER OF THE WEEK
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written by Lucrezia < PM: >

In the last week, YWS (primarily the forums) has been abuzz with a new, much-debated idea—Writer of the Week. If you visited The Lounge, you probably saw the forum about it, bobbing at the very top of the page as it climbed in both posts and views.

For those of you that did not click on, Writer of the Week is a pretty simple concept. In fact, the name really says it all. Once a week, one of the many talented writers here on YWS will get their chance to be acknowledged for their awesomeness and skill.

Now, if my psychic abilities are correct (they usually are), I would guess you’re thinking: Don’t we already have that, with the Literary Spotlight?

Wrong!

Writer of the Week is different from both featured member and the Spotlight. While featured members are active all over the site (most particularly with reviewing and forum stalking browsing), and the Spotlight shows off the works with the most Likes, Writer of the Week’s goal is to give an unbiased look at the talented authors that make YWS what it is. Writer of the Week—or “WOTW” for short—aims to give the more underrated, less appreciated novelists, or screenwriters, or essay authors a bit of glory, and show YWSers why they should review things outside their comfort zones. Because poetry and shorts aren’t the only types of literature YWS has to offer!

Another thing that separates WOTW from the Spotlight is the focus it puts on the writers behind the literary works you love. The people that make YWS what it is, and who have given us countless great pieces to read and review.

The first-ever WOTW was very special, because it gave all of YWS a chance to vote for the person they thought best deserved this special acknowledgement. They could nominate their favorite writers by visiting this forum here , so authors of all different genres, from poets to novelists, got the chance to earn the title. After a few days of voting, the first-ever WOTW was crowned: The amazing @TriSARAHtops!

This was the first and last week, at least for the time being, that the members of YWS got to all vote for who they wanted as WOTW. From now on, writers will be selected by a small but dedicated panel of judges, who work tirelessly to find and acknowledge the amazing authors on this site. Because of this, the next WOTW could literally be anyone—from a well-known poet to an underrated, exceptionally talented novelist. All in the hope of not only making these amazing writers feel honored for their accomplishments, but also that the extra recognition will stir up interest in their portfolios and hopefully get them more reviews! (Because, seriously, who doesn’t love reviews?!)

Writer of the Week will be divided in sections—there will be a category for novelists, short writers, poets, and finally, screenwriters/essay writers and those that have written anything in the “other” genre. This way, everyone—no matter what you write—will get a chance to be recognized for their amazing pieces.

It’s easy to see why TriSARAHtops was chosen if you’ve read any of her works. She is incredibly talented with everything, from imagery to pacing. And if you’re still not convinced, you can find her portfolio right here. I highly recommend giving it a look. ;)

And if you’re bummed you didn’t get chosen this week, rest assured—everyone on here has a fair chance at being Writer of the Week, so long as they get out there and write! Our panel of judges are incredibly fair people that are determined to find and spotlight some of YWS’s true talent, including and especially those that have gone relatively undiscovered until now.

So keep your eyes open . . . because the next Writer of the Week could be you!





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Mon Mar 10, 2014 4:31 am
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ADVENTURES IN WRITING
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written by BlueAfrica < PM: >

Today I’m going to make a suggestion to you: When you’ve finished writing something and doing major revisions, read your work out loud.

I rarely suggest this, because I don’t like doing it myself. Historically, I’ve only done it for poetry. Poetry is rhythm-based and tends to be short, so reading it aloud is necessary and not too painful. However, fiction, I’ve always thought, could benefit from a silent reading as much as a vocal one.

Not so.

After revising The Book Man and sending it off to my beta readers, I spent a week reading it aloud. Now I feel like apologizing to my readers. There were few typos, but the number of inconsistencies I heard that I didn’t catch before — I shudder just thinking about it.

Don’t even get me started on the long sentences. In this particular book, longer sentences are a stylistic choice (to an extent), but what I found was ridiculous. Sentence after sentence made up of fifty words or more — not run-ons, but compounded compounds. The closer I got to the climax, the longer my sentences grew. By reading aloud, I trimmed nearly 500 words from my novel. I’d bet at least half were the word “and” as I cut too-long sentences in two (or three or four).

Of course, reading your work aloud isn’t easy, especially if it’s a novel. It’s time-consuming. You can’t do it while eating (at least, I wouldn’t recommend it). And if you’re like me, you don’t want anyone to hear you, which means you have to find a time and place to read in private.

The benefits of reading your work out loud, however, far outweigh the inconveniences. Here are three of them.

You’ll catch inconsistencies. After several months spent rewriting and revising, it’s hard to catch inconsistencies in your work. You’ve been through so many changes that you can hardly keep track of what’s good as-is and what’s been changed. But just as writing notes in class can help you remember a lecture, hearing something you’ve written can improve your memory of it. Reading aloud, you become the Superman of editing. You fly faster than a speeding typewriter and leap a hundred pages in a single bound, jumping far back in the story to change a single word that no longer works with what you wrote later.

You’ll even catch technical inconsistencies. For example, maybe the phrase “rose garden” comes up in your story several times. Sometimes, you wrote it as “rose garden”; others, you wrote it as “rose-garden.” A hyphen is such a small thing, but using it in a certain situation sometimes but not others can make your manuscript look unprofessional. Reading aloud can help you notice that you’ve used two different spellings of a word or phrase.

Catch stilted dialogue. Dialogue is probably the number one reason anyone ever suggests reading your work aloud, because dialogue is speech captured on paper. Your dialogue might sound fine in your head, but when you read it out loud you may find that it sounds unnatural, awkward, or rehearsed.

I admit this is one area where reading aloud didn’t help me much. I have a weird habit of practicing my dialogue out loud before writing a scene, as if I’m rehearsing lines for a play. By the time I read my story over, my dialogue has been spoken and revised more than a dozen times.

(Please tell me I’m not the only one who does this.)

That doesn’t go for all my scenes — just the most dramatic ones. Even so, it’s a testament to the good that speaking your story can do.

Catch awkward prose. I’ve already told you the horrors of finding stupidly long sentences in The Book Man. It’s more than that, though. If you find that you have to read a sentence aloud several times to understand what you wrote, you can bet that your readers are going to have a hard time with it. Maybe you phrased it weirdly or put some words in an unusual order. Or maybe the sentence is so rambling that you forget how it began before you’ve reached the end.

Of course, outside readers may find some sentences confusing that you didn’t. They may think a certain line of dialogue cheesy that you thought was brilliant or catch a typo you overlooked. Overall, however, reading your work aloud can go a long way toward making it shine.





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Mon Mar 10, 2014 4:32 am
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RESOURCES RELAY
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written by Tenyo < PM: >


This Week

So, what's been happening in Resources over the past seven days? Ask an Expert has been buzzing with activity while Writing Tips is looking rather neglected. I guess that means everyone is working really hard on their projects!


Publishing Poetry Collections

Writing poetry and writing a novel are just two different types of the same thing, so the method of publishing is the same, right?

Well, not really. Poetry Anthologies and novels may both be printed on paper and sold for money, but that's as far as the similarities go.

Poetry is a much harder market to get into, and you can find out all the details why in @shoaib 's thread on publishing poetry collections .


How to writers write masterpieces?

I love this one. It's like 'what do women really want?' or 'why don't sheep shrink in the rain?'

Before we can find an answer to @rawrafied 's question we first have to figure out what a masterpiece is.

Back in the 1500's a Masterpiece wasn't the best or most popular piece, it was the one used to show competency to be called a 'master' of a craft. It comes from the Dutch word 'meersterstuck' which, literally translated, means master work.

Times change, words too. Masterpiece is a pretty big word and not to be handed out like perfume stick at a sample table. Can you imagine it? Au de master, the new fragrance from Famenfortune. Buy before December 25th to get a free bottle of Instant Ka-ching.

Back to seriousness, though, do we still base it on ability and craftsmanship, or is it more to do with popularity and recognition?

Who is it that has the right to decide what is a meesterstuck, and more importantly, who is it that has the key to creating one?

Weigh in your thoughts here.


Fortune cookie wisdoms

Compiling word lists from the dictionary will help to build a useful vocabulary. True/False?

Answer:
False. It may help you to increase the amount of words you know, but not necessarily ones that will be useful to you.

Check out more in @dhyan 's thread on Building Vocabulary.


Feed 'em up
The Will Review For Food has three new reviewers looking for something to chomp on.

@Monster is offering objective and critical reviews in a quest to help others improve their work, so if you can take the heat, go for it.

@Messenger is looking to devour some short works or opening chapters (and maybe poetry, if you're really nice.)

And lastly we have @ERZA offering to review short stories, poems and lyrics to push her towards her first blue star.





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Mon Mar 10, 2014 4:33 am
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TRAFFIC LIGHTING WRITING: WRITING LIKE YOU SPEAK
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written by Clarity < PM: >

Welcome to Traffic Lighting Writing! This is a new addition to Squills where I’ll talk about different things in writing that irritate me and other people! Feel free to send a suggestion.


We all have them little things that just really bug us. Sometimes they’re used when writing, which is even more irritating I have to say.

I know that in my city, we tend to talk differently to how we write. I’m sure this happens in other places too?

For example, if I was to write “I went to the shops today and bought some really lovely flowers for my mum.” I would say it like “Went to shops today ‘nd bought some really lovely flowers for me mum.” This is just an example of how my writing differs from my speech. I write full sentences, but when I’m talking to a friend I’ll shorten it and adapt to the general speech pattern of people around my area. I’m guessing most of you do too?

This leads onto my point of how not to write a sentence. Fair enough, each and every person has their own style of writing, but writing in a regional way, or in the way one may speak really gets on my nerves. I don’t mind if it’s in speech marks, because that helps show who the character is, but if you write the entire story in that way, you can see how it might have a negative effect.

Well, I need to put the lighting into the writing, so let’s get on with it.

Red: Writing in your talking voice is not good. Think about the wide range of people who’ll be reading what you’re writing, we’re not all from the same area, so you need to write in a way that everyone can understand.

Amber: The point above refers more so to third person writing, and is more acceptable in first person. But, it’s still not what I’d recommend. You want to be original, but you don’t want to be the only one who understands what you’re saying. It’s almost like writing in text talk. “U r 2 gud 2 b true.” Imagine seeing that in a romantic scene of a story, ouch, we’re not all going to understand it and it just looks terrible.

Green: If you’re going to write like this, only do it in speech marks. It could actually work in your favour because, as the readers, we’d be able to see more of your characters. Same goes for the text talk. Imagine you’re writing a text conversation between two people, you could make the writing quality differ between people; use it to your advantage in portraying your characters. (Slightly stereotypical things might occur, but doesn’t that happen in most, if not all writing?)





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Mon Mar 10, 2014 4:33 am
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SLANG INNIT?!
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written by BloodinkSeesFootage < PM: >

Inspired by @Niraco's work Slang I decided to explore the use of slang in our writing and creative pursuits.

Colloquialisms, otherwise known as slang, allows us to expand our vocabulary into the realm of the 'self-generated' word to get our point across. This is something Niraco has done in their new work, and I wanted to find out how.

Squills: Hey! So, what inspired the work 'Slang'?


Niraco: The weather in Glasgow, where I live. It was really sunny for the first half of the afternoon, then just gloomy and rainy for the rest of the day. When I was watching a report on the Scottish referendum, the idea for a poem about how generally gloomy Glasgow is morphed from my original writing about the weather.

S: Do you think using slang words can help add to a work, in terms of making it more realistic?


P: Much of Glaswegian literature uses slang, so we see it as something great. By having slang, you get to know some of the language used by that culture. I think it does make a work more realistic.

S: What advice would you give to other writers about using slang in their work?


P: Provide a glossary. Make sure you know the meaning of the words. So basically, make sure you know the ins and outs of the slang terms you're using before writing with them.


Another member who profoundly uses slang in their work is @pengtingking. I managed to grab him for a couple of questions.

S: Why do you use so much slang in your work?


pengtingking: coz dats how mandem talks innit, on da street fam

(Because that's how the people take on the street, isn't it.)

S: And how does 'da street' transfer into 'da literature'?


pengtingking: wll i talk bout da struggles 4 a mandem

(Well, I talk about the struggles for the people)

It seems that using slang is a great way of adding colour to your work; albeit a little difficult to read sometimes! But... it is something to bear in mind when wanting to add character to your writing style.

Don't forget to keep reviewing and posting. :)





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Mon Mar 10, 2014 4:35 am
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GREEN ROOM GALLERY
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by KnightTeen < PM: >

Hello my lovies! I feel like we don't talk a lot any more, so I've decided to rectify that situation.

How are you?
How's the family?
Been well lately?
The weather here has been really weird these last few days, but we're hoping to see sunny skies on the horizon.

Well, there. I think that I have been pleasant enough for today.

*Bursts into sobs*

MY LITTLE SISTERS HAVE BEEN SICK AND IT'S PURE, RAGING HELL AT MY PLACE.

There.
Glad that's off my chest.

But see, that's not the only problem. It's not just my sisters. It seems to be everyone but me.
*cowers in a corner*
But there's nothing I can do. We're all being medicated, and they went to the Emergency Center to get prescriptions for my sisters, so we should be having a healthier household soon..
*gulp*
I hope.

But they aren't the only one's that are sick.
The Green Room has had HVA for the past few days. In fact, that's the longest I have ever seen a High Volume Alert in my short little life on YWS.
(For the newbies, HVA happens when we all get typing-happy, post way to many works, and cause the GR to overflow. HVA lasts until the number drops down to a more manageable size, and during HVA post cost goes up.)
It's our way of regulating the reviews to post ratio.

But any way, yeah, YWS has had a recent epidemic. I'm still trying to find out if we are going to be quarantined, but that seems unlikely as the disease is slowly but surely vanishing into the proverbial mist.

But anyway, it seems this epidemic is almost over, so let's finish curing it, shall we?

Pokemon Ultimate Evolution Season 2: Episode 10, An Annoyingly Vivid Colour (wow that's a mouthful) is currently the oldest work in the Green Room without any reviews.

It was posted on February 24, and has been sitting their ever since.
Written by @dark, it is part of a larger series consisting currently of 2 seasons and 25 episodes. Let me tell you, that is impressive. I have never seen anything like it, and from the looks of it, it's really good.
But, this is a warning to all those who wish to click it.
If you don't like language, violence, or mature content, this is something to be avoided. It's got a 16+ rating attached to it.

Until next time.





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Mon Mar 10, 2014 4:35 am
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KANOME’S RANT OF MEDIA
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Written by Kanome < PM: >

Kanome here with another media review for you, the members of YWS!

Okay, I played this really interesting game a couple of weeks ago. I enjoyed the storyline, the excitement, just plain everything! I am talking about Bioshock Infinite.

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Let me start off of what this game is about. This game is about a man named Booker Dewitt who has to find a girl in order to pay off a debt. This girl was held in captivity due to her “abilities.”

I was intrigued of this game because it wasn’t like the rest of the bioshock series. I was amazingly shocked when I found out that this is a whole new story.

When I played through the game, there are some weapons and some power-ups used in the game. My favorite power-up was electricity and my favorite weapon was the Huntsman Carbine.

The ending of the game was a huge shocker and a disappointment. I cannot tell you how much I cussed at the game because of that ending. The game was good and all, but dang, that ending could’ve been way better than that.

I also found out that the game was somewhat linked to the other bioshock games. The story of bioshock infinite probably occurred during the first bioshock game, at least, that’s what I think.

All in all, I give this game a good 4.5 out of 5 stars!

If you like the first two bioshocks, you will certainly like this one! C:





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Mon Mar 10, 2014 4:37 am
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MYTHICAL CORNER
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Written by whitewolfpuppy < PM: >

Eris, Goddess of Chaos and Discord


Eris is known to be the goddess of Chaos and Discord. Her Roman title is Discordia. Her parents are different depending on the myth; in some myths she is the daughter of Zeus and Hera while in other myths she is the daughter of Erebos and Nyx, or sometimes Nyx alone.

One of Eris most greatest moments was during the wedding of Peleus and Thetis. Eris, however, was not invited. Steaming with anger, she went to the wedding anyways. Tossing a golden apple with the inscription "TO THE FAIREST" on it. Most of the gods and goddesses recoiled from this. Though, Athena, Hera, and Aphrodite did not, and argued over it. Eventually, they consulted Zeus. Though, knowing Zeus he did not want to anger his wife nor his daughters, so he sent them to a mortal named Paris. He choose Aphrodite over the other two. Soon later, he came to marry Helen of Troy which ended up the fight between Greece and Troy.

As always, Eris could not help herself but cause chaos among the land. As her golden apple caused the fight between Greece and Troy, she was too within that war. Eris rode a chariot with her brothers Ares and Enyo. Eris sided Aphrodite. Eris's main and only goal was to protect the son of Venus and Trojan royalty, Aeneas. Aeneas escaped from the war then found Rome.

So, if you ever see a golden apple. Don’t touch it!

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Mon Mar 10, 2014 4:37 am
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ALONE
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written by Clarity < PM: >

Edgar Allen Poe, who hasn’t heard of this man? He is the poet who inspired to me begin writing, and his words awakened the admiration I now have for poetry.

Alone is one of many great poems he wrote, but this is one of my favourites; I think the emotion just radiates from this poem, it’s hard not to love it.



From childhood's hour I have not been
As others were; I have not seen
As others saw; I could not bring
My passions from a common spring.
From the same source I have not taken
My sorrow; I could not awaken
My heart to joy at the same tone;
And all I loved, I loved alone.
Then- in my childhood, in the dawn
Of a most stormy life- was drawn
From every depth of good and ill
The mystery which binds me still:
From the torrent, or the fountain,
From the red cliff of the mountain,
From the sun that round me rolled
In its autumn tint of gold,
From the lightning in the sky
As it passed me flying by,
From the thunder and the storm,
And the cloud that took the form
(When the rest of Heaven was blue)
Of a demon in my view.



Do you see what I mean? It’s simply wonderful.

When I was little, around the age of five and onwards, I despised even the thought of reading. It was not until I got to thirteen years old, where I even began to look at a book and want to read it.
The reading became an obsession, and from that, I was inspired to write. I was never very good at it, just the odd failed short story; I’d never even given poetry a second glance. But, after reading a series of books and discovering the amazing Poe within them, I was hooked. Edgar Allan Poe became my inspiration for poetry. I adored his work and it became my own dream to maybe be as good as him one day.

I’m sure many young poets and writers have an inspirational figure; the person whose work you adored, and will most likely still adore is nestled into the back of your mind, and it will always be there. No matter how many poets I discover, no matter how brilliant I find their poetry, I will never forget the impact that Poe had on my life.

Alone is a tremendous poem and I feel honoured just to be able to read it. The emotion in this poem differs, but Poe used it effectively. It’s a sad concept, and much of it is sad itself, but it’s beautiful, and in that it’s easy to see the light that this poem shines. It may now be overly happy, but really, what is?

I’ve often found that some of the best poems are the sad ones; it’s these emotions that overtake our minds, we’re consumed by feelings of hurt and such. So, that explains it, right? A poet transfers their hurt onto the paper, using words as their therapy and using the message as their encouragement.

This poem has an extreme effect on me, but what poem and/or poet has an extreme effect on you? Who/what has inspired you? PM with a poet and a poem, and I’ll dedicate my next article on it. It’s a lovely thing to be able to see what affects each individual.





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Mon Mar 10, 2014 4:38 am
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NEW ARRIVALS
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by KnightTeen < PM: >

I am proud to announce that we have reached 29,356 users!
You know me, I'm a snoop! I have to know everything about every new member on the site. (Don't hate me, it's all part of the job!)

Take a moment to welcome this week's newest members to the site!

@BTubz has been a member since the beginning of the month, and has written several reviews and posted several works since joining.

@greywords joined us late last month, and has been pretty active ever since. She's done a pretty good job with the reviews that she has written, and has posted some poetry for us to enjoy.

@Venonymous seems to share my liking for the Watchmen, given that his avatar appears to be Rorschach (if I'm right, you totally rock! If I'm wrong, I totally suck :( ). He's written several reviews since joining us three days ago, but his portfolio is strangly empty. Hmm. Give this author some encouragement, and let's see what he can do.

Others who haven't had a chance to be as active, but are no less a member of our family are....



@awesomeme4@youngjazz@luthurox@online10@AdjiFlex@secretemogirl21@Bewildered@DeathAlice@Tahseen@Betty@thefors@Squidgy@LivLoveConverse@cianfarano@lilolyeti@SaziaAfrin@mikeX16@Squishypie98@Babarnoor@jessicajj552@Bloodthristy@HiImSociallyAwkwardK@Rasheedha@edgar@areswarrior32 • @wordelixer • @MariahMazzy97@angeltrash@AaliyahHaqq@eminorth@Della@Delirium@Chahinez@amritpti@YCirilo@Zontafer@kori@faithless0408 • @KissMe99 • @Jonelle@Collier9@Kibosh@nrizyap@heaven@disheartedallure22@Creepers@BeautifulGirl@sbwcrafts@greenday@Thirteen@joeshekeem@newlybliss@life001@farahtoghan@Karma531@taylor51599@tgillett51599@Thatonewriter@InSaNiTy@fallenoutofgrace@ReligionOfBen@musiiccutiee@noah004@Louisa@loril3 • @adunl • @iLegoBella@colourmeinkindness@aizekezia@BalajiSelva@Marlie@QuantumDice@CaptainLynn@Mohammed@kimburibe@Malooga@Tevatron@kevinsonnier@NinoshkaDelacruz@malbania@Ashleyxo@AMxo@Jailene@Jessicaa605@Yami12@LovenEpix@tinnymagic@JamieMaming@But1baby2your3mine4@julwes@DarkAngelForgiven@faitheloo@HereticalTruth@kelsey99





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Mon Mar 10, 2014 4:38 am
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THIS WEEK'S ROUNDUP - 3/9
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written by megsug < PM: >




Why do we do it? Why is it okay? @BenFranks thinks:



We like to communicate. A lot of us swear (cuss) often because its a form of expression. We all know what they mean (or mostly), and the more we use them the less we take offence.



A lot of people are more interested about how bad words got their bad rap rather than why we use them. That question hasn't really been answered. What do you think?



@dhyan brings up some good questions in Ask An Expert . YWS is all about writing, but reading is important in the writing process. Dhyan wants to know:



What specific types of knowledge can we gain from reading?. E.g. words collocation, style etc.

What can we learn from a single sentence? Or a single paragraph. So that we get the most of what it can give Us.

What though process runs in your mind when you read an expository article compared to a fiction? Or anytime writing compared to another?




@Tenyo thinks the reader needs to imagine the text as vividly as possible, so it feels real. @Lucrezia thinks readers need to reread and highlight parts that stick out and make the most impact. She also suggests doing a report at the end. How do you read like a professor?


...Of contests. @WritingWolf has started a contest that’s pretty ingenious. She judging your contests and how fantastic they are. You heard me right. She’ll be judging on four things:



1. How creative your theme is.
2. How big a turnout you get.
3. Why you chose the winners you chose.
4. What the participants thought of your contest.




The prizes are pretty great too. Last place get 200 points and a review. Second place gets 500 points and two reviews, and first place gets 800 points and three reviews. Deadline is April 1st which means you have to have your winners decided on and posted by then.


@Aley’s got a great idea going on. She’s posting links to YWS poems she really likes. She invites you to do the same with one rule:



Do not put up your own poems.



Other than that, you have free reign. @Purple’s poem is the only poem in the thread right now. I’m sure some of you have must reads bookmarked for us.





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