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Only Needed- Horse Show Checklist

by breechesdotcom, olivia


Warning: This work has been rated 16+.

Getting ready for a horse show is the ultimate test of organization, early preparation and deep, relaxed breathing-- 3 things equestrians are not always good at, especially if you show green horses! With this easy guide, getting everything ready will seem not as overwhelming.

Before starting, there are several things to figure out in order to start packing.

ARE THESE QUESTIONS POPPING UP IN YOUR MIND AS WELL?

Confused Equestrian

Is this an overnight show, if so how many days?

How far away is the show grounds from your barn?

Does your horse eat and/ or drink away from home?

Will the grounds provide water?

How much are entry fees?

Is there a trailering fee?

Which classes are you entering?

Is this a rated or schooling show?

Will you or your barn be renting stalls or will you be tied to the trailer?

DOWNLOAD YOUR HORSE SHOW

CHECKLIST NOW

Making separate lists for the rider and for the horse can be an easy way to organize your tack, clothing and supplies.

Knowing this information first will make packing much easier and you and your horse will be prepared. For instance, you will not need extra bedding, pitchforks etc. if your barn will not be renting stalls. Familiarizing yourself with the overview of the show, accommodations, for both horse and rider, and other expectations will determine what (and how much of it) you will pack.

WHAT PAPERWORK DO I NEED TO BRING TO PARTICIPATE IN A HORSE SHOW?

The first things to think about when packing for a show are paperwork and necessary documents that the show delegates will require of you. These might depend on the governing body that is facilitating the show.

A few general documents that should always have a place safely tucked in a closable folder are:

Trailering all the way in and finding out that you don’t have the needed paperwork to even step into the ring can be quite frustrating. Compensate for the time needed to acquire the paperwork too! Don’t wait until the day before the show to ask your vet for a negative Coggins or health certification.

What do I bring for my horse in the horse show?

After you’ve wrangled up your paperwork and answered those first few questions, you should start the official packing.

This is where a few of those questions are necessary to have answered. If your horse is a finicky eater and you know or have doubts that he or she will eat and drink regularly off property, bringing food and water from “home” may help. Even slightly different tasting water can seem like the world is ending to a picky horse.

WHAT WILL MY HORSE EAT IN THE HORSE SHOW?

horse food

Not eating will add additional stress to your horse, not allowing them to perform at their best. If your horse has not eaten or consumed water in a long amount of time and they seem lethargic or depressed, scratching from the rest of your classes may be the healthiest choice. Shipping sicknesses can also be a part of this too-- another reason why having an updated health certificate is so important; it isn’t just an inconvenience, it’s to protect the horses!

  • Hay
  • Water
  • Buckets (at least 2- 1 for drinking water and another for bathing)
  • Flavoring and/ or electrolytes
  • Grain (the usual type, brand and amounts)

Bringing food and water from home is a good idea anyway in case there are issues with the provided feed or water. Packing a powdered electrolyte or flavoring mix could be the difference between a healthy or dangerously dehydrated horse. Always offer water multiple times throughout the day even between classes.

WHAT HORSE TACK WILL I NEED IN THE HORSE SHOW?

Depending on the type of show you’re attending and if you compete in several disciplines, be sure to pack the trailer with your necessary tack. If you are an all-arounder and dabble in several disciplines, but are attending a hunter- jumper show, don’t bring your western saddle, “in case you need it”. It is only more work and clutter in the trailer’s tack room. More is not always more.

  • Horse razor and small travel clippers for touch ups
  • Bedding (if needed)
  • Sponge
  • Fly sheet or scrim
  • Fly spray
  • Extra braiding materials and tools (you know those buggers never stay)

If you sometimes need to change bits, bridles, girths or even saddles during your lesson, bring all that you expect to use or might need. If you decide to enter into a fence class and you always school fences in a pelham, then bring a pelham.

Don’t forget about first aid and post-workout items:

first aid for horse show

  • Iodine scrub
  • Gauze
  • Scissors
  • Thermometer
  • Abscess kit- diaper, duct tape, hoof packing
  • Bute
  • When you just HAD TO have that ½ price bit from the tack shop, but haven’t had time to test it out first, leave it at home. With lots of other horses whinnying, getting loose and bolting in the warm-up ring, there is plenty of other stimulation happening rather than concentrating on new equipment. Introducing new tack and equipment should only be done at home in a controlled environment.

    What do you need to bring to a horse show?

    Packing for yourself can be pretty easy with a couple of reminders. If you are your own groom, as many people are, you’ll need a few extra items.

    Of course, you’ll need properly fitted show clothes such as:

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    User avatar
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    Sun Apr 26, 2020 3:05 am
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    alliyah wrote a review...



    Hi there! Thanks for sharing your informational article with us - I think the bullet point lists are useful, because they convey a lot of information quickly, but I think some of the bullet points could have used more explanation because of the technical nature of horse riding - for instance, you list "belts" under clothing items, but it would be useful to have a little more information on what type of belt you're referring to. I think honestly a picture would be really useful in that section, maybe with clothing items labled, because coat, boots, and belts, could mean like a winter parka, uggs, and a rope belt, and I'm guessing that'd be completely wrong, but wouldnt' know because the list doesn't specify.

    One problem I had with this article is it didn't seem clear whether you were trying to take a more informal, funny, casual tone, or an authoritative / fact-informed one. There are just a couple sparse "joke" moments, like the all-caps for "Just HAD to" and the line, "you know those buggers never stay" - but with so few jokes it ended up making those moments slightly awkward. I think if you're going to add funny notes, then really commit to it, and set the light-casual tone from the intro, or else it takes the reader by surprise and feels kind of awkward.

    Also as far as introduction, I don't think the questions at the beginning was the best way to get the reader's attention, there were too many questions and it just didn't feel necessary. I would simplify a little bit there, or maybe give some background on who you are and why you have the expertise to give this information.

    Good luck in your writing! Let me know if you have any questions.

    - alliyah

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    Sat Apr 04, 2020 2:32 pm
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    whatchamacallit wrote a review...



    Hi breechesdotcom and Olivia! I'll be frank with you, I don't know much about horses so I'm just going to presume everything in the article is accurate/correct. So really I'll just make a few grammar corrections and other nitpicks.

    For your intro paragraph:
    I would put a comma after "early preparation". This is called an oxford comma, which means putting a comma after the second last item in a list. You don't need one, I just prefer them.
    For this line: "With this easy guide, getting everything ready will seem not as overwhelming."
    Consider changing it to "... getting everything read won't seem as overwhelming". This sounds more natural.
    "Before starting, there are several things to figure out in order to start packing." The sentence is a little bit redundant. You could consider trying, "Before starting to pack, there are several things to figure out" to make it a little more concise.

    For your list of questions:
    "Is this an overnight show, and if so for how many days?"

    For Download your checklist paragraph:
    "Knowing this information first beforehand will make packing much easier and you and your horse will be prepared."

    "Familiarizing yourself with the overview of the show and accommodations..."


    Under your paperwork section:
    "A few general documents that you should always have safely stored in a folder include :"

    "After you’ve wrangled up your paperwork and answered those first few questions, you should start the official packing." I would reword this sentence. It feels a bit awkward.


    For What your horse eats section:
    "Not eating will add additional stress to your horse, which may not allow them to perform at their best. If your horse has not eaten or consumed water for a long time and they seem lethargic or depressed, removing them from the rest of your classes may be the healthiest choice. Shipping sicknesses can also be a part of this too -- another reason why having an updated health certificate is so important; it isn’t just an inconvenience, it’s to protect the horses!"

    "Bringing food and water from home is a good idea anyway in case there are issues with the provided feed or water."


    Horse Tack section:
    "Depending on the type of show you’re attending and if you are competing in several disciplines, be sure to pack the trailer with the appropriate tack. If you are an all-arounder and dabble in several disciplines, but are attending a hunter- jumper show, don’t bring your western saddle, 'in case you need it'."

    The rest of the article looks good!

    You don't need to change anything I recommended, they're just to make the wording flow better. Overall, this was a very well organized article!

    Whatchamacallit.





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