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Gotham v. Joker, 1894 (Chapter Ten)

by MeherazulAzim16


Bruce woke up sixteen hours later and started pacing back and forth in the living room. It occurred to him that his letter—the one where he talked about Crane—had already been delivered to Gordon. He paced for quite a long time, considering the possible consequences. Then suddenly, without a word, he went down to the cave, picked up his cowl, and left.

Now, Batman walks through a snowy white corridor in the second floor of the GCPD building. He unexpectedly runs into Selina sitting in a bench—her wounded arm has been bandaged. She smiles seeing him and stands up.

“How was the sleep?” she asks.

“Good,” Batman replies. “What are you still doing here?”

Still? They didn’t detain me! I mean, they tried to arrest me for some old housebreaking incident but didn’t have probable cause,” she says and then whispers, “What can I say? I’m good at my job.”

“Is that a confession?” Batman emulates seriousness.

“Yes. Go ahead and arrest me.”

“Maybe later.”

Selina laughs.

“But really, what are you doing here?” Batman asks.

“I just returned to give a statement.”

“Oh.”

She gets closer to him. “Don’t worry,” she whispers. “I won’t tell them about Harley.”

Batman nods in gratitude. He notices two officers in the corridor, staring at them curiously. They must be wondering what the Bat and the Cat are chatting about.

“I’ll talk to you later,” he tells Selina and approaches the officers. They step back.

“What do you want?!” One officer blurts.

“I need to speak to Gordon. Do you know where he is?”

“I went to his office just a while back,” the other officer says. “He wasn’t there.”

Batman thanks them and strides past. “He must be on the roof then,” Bruce thinks as he reaches the foot of the stairs at the end of the corridor.

As he expected, Gordon is leaning over the railing, alone, smoking a cigarette and staring at the city lights. If you pay enough attention, you can catch the lights going out, one by one, as the Gothamites dim their lamps and slip into their beds. Soon, only the street lights will remain. Even they will be obscured by the invading fog and crickets.

“It’s you, isn’t it?” Gordon says without turning back.

Silence.

“Yep.”

“I’m sorry, Gordon,” Bruce finally speaks.

“You are a terrible friend, do you know that?”

Silence again.

“We have failed, Batman. This crusade has been in vain. We thought we could clean up this city. We thought we could help those lunatics … We were wrong and now my daughter is dead.”

“We got Joker, didn’t we?” Batman says.

Gordon turns around and throws away his cigarette in anger. “For goodness sake, is that what this is to you? Just a case? Oh we got the bad guy. Case solved. Everything is good now!”

Batman wavers. “That’s not what I meant, Gordon.”

“I know, I know!” Gordon growls and then takes a moment to collect himself. “It’s just how I’ve been coping. I’ve been blaming all this on you. It’s … I’m sorry. You’re my only real friend in this city. You can’t tell but I’m actually glad to see you.”

Batman wonders if Gordon received the letter. If he did, he shouldn’t have been acting this leniently. “Did you get the letter?” Batman directly asks.

Gordon squints and reaches into his coat pocket. He brings out an yellow envelope. “It was from you? Came from an anonymous source, so I didn’t open. These letters never carry any good news, you know? Tips and all that. Sure, they are invaluable. Without your tips throughout the years, we’d have been helpless but they also mean more work and I’m not currently—”

“Listen, Gordon,” Batman interjects, “this is a different letter. And…”

Gordon shoots him a confused look. “And what?”

“If you read it, you’ll learn some things about me that will make you hate me, drive you to end our friendship.”

“But you wrote the letter, right? I don’t understand. Why would you write something like that about yourself?”

“Because it’s true.”

Batman walks forward, leans over the railing and stares at the cityscape—almost all the lights have gone out now. Beside him, Gordon pockets the envelope and lights another cigarette. “I’ll mull it over then,” he says. “Also, listen, I haven’t had the time to arrange a funeral but I’m working on it. I want you to be there. You can come as you are. It won’t be a problem. Bring your boy too if you can.”

Silence. Batman has never hated himself more.


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User avatar
24 Reviews


Points: 2217
Reviews: 24

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Fri Nov 05, 2021 9:07 pm
GoodieGoat says...



Hello MeherazulAzim16 its great to frequent yourself and one of the chapters of this series again!

I have read chapters twelve and thirteen and I remember how infuriated Gordon becomes at Batman. The contents of Batman's letter surely must be brutal for Gordon's attitude to shift as it does. While this though is somewhat strange with its foreknowledge its an interesting contrast to see the Gordon of the future and his wrath towards Batman versus his character at this moment. He refers to Batman as 'His only friend in the city.' and is even willing to forgive a misplaced attempt from Batman at comforting him in the aftermath of his daughter's death.

I enjoyed the dialogue between Batman and who I assume is Catwomen. In this series I'm unsure if their relationship has the romantic undertones it has in other Batman media, either way I found it larky and witty and becoming of these characters. Other aspect I though was exceptional is your description of Gotham and the way you punctuate you dialogue and setting with silence. The way the cityscape of Gotham is described is gorgeous. As for silence punctuation thing it is reminiscent to a movie not having a soundtrack to a scene and allowing the ambiance or lack thereof to crush the crux of the scene down on the viewer. You also don't overdo it in my opinion which is critical for the success of this unique effect.

The two things believe you could alter is firstly as LadyTano suggested to put some more drama and desperation behind Gordon when the death of his daughter his brought up. The second is a piece of writing advice I've come acrossed is to avoid beginning a sentence of action with 'suddenly' or something to that tune. I believe you could reword Batman's departure in the first paragraph to something along the lines of "Wordlessly, he went into his cave, gazed back at the eye holes of his cowl, and vanished into the night."

I hope this has been useful and encouraging!
Sincerely,
GoodieGoat

Edit: Oops my computer glitched sorry about the repetition.




User avatar
24 Reviews


Points: 2217
Reviews: 24

Donate
Fri Nov 05, 2021 9:07 pm
GoodieGoat wrote a review...



Hello MeherazulAzim16 its great to frequent yourself and one of the chapters of this series again!

I have read chapters twelve and thirteen and I remember how infuriated Gordon becomes at Batman. The contents of Batman's letter surely must be brutal for Gordon's attitude to shift as it does. While this though is somewhat strange with its foreknowledge its an interesting contrast to see the Gordon of the future and his wrath towards Batman versus his character at this moment. He refers to Batman as 'His only friend in the city.' and is even willing to forgive a misplaced attempt from Batman at comforting him in the aftermath of his daughter's death.

I enjoyed the dialogue between Batman and who I assume is Catwomen. In this series I'm unsure if their relationship has the romantic undertones it has in other Batman media, either way I found it larky and witty and becoming of these characters. Another aspect I though was exceptional is your description of Gotham and the way you punctuate you dialogue and setting with silence. The way the cityscape of Gotham is described is gorgeous. As for silence punctuation thing it is reminiscent to a movie not having a soundtrack to a scene and allowing the ambiance or lack thereof to crush the crux of the scene down on the viewer. You also don't overdo it in my opinion which is critical for the success of this unique effect.

The two things believe you could alter is firstly as LadyTano suggested to put some more drama and desperation behind Gordon when the death of his daughter is brought up. The second is a piece of writing advice I've come acrossed is to avoid beginning a sentence of action with 'suddenly' or something to that tune. I believe you could reword Batman's departure in the first paragraph to something along the lines of "Wordlessly, he went into his cave, gazed back at the eye holes of his cowl, and vanished into the night."

I hope this has been useful and encouraging!
Sincerely,
GoodieGoat




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8 Reviews


Points: 818
Reviews: 8

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Fri Sep 03, 2021 1:37 am
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LadyTano wrote a review...



Hello and Good day!

I haven't reviewed any of your chapters in a while, so I thought to come back and review this one in honor of Review Month!
Okay, this is quite a good chapter, and although it doesn't look that short, I feel like it has few ideas in it, and it doesn't further the story much. But there are key parts to it, like Batman giving the letter to Gordon.
I liked this particular sentence in the story:

Then suddenly, without a word, he went down to the cave, picked up his cowl, and left.

And this one paints a good visual of the surroundings, but you might want to change the "in" to "on":
Now, Batman walks through a snowy white corridor in the second floor of the GCPD building.

I enjoyed the conversation between Batman and Selina, they seem to be very good friends, as do Gordon and Batman.
For some reason, I just had to laugh at this paragraph:
Silence. Batman has never hated himself more.

And, Gordon is grieving, and a lonely rooftop is a good place to do it. For some reason, I just didn't feel like he was taking it hard enough though.

Anyway, I liked this chapter, keep it up!

Lady Tano

(previously Miecz Autorski)






thanks for the review, tano!




How can I be king of the world? Because I am king of rubbish. And rubbish is what the world is made of.
— Kate DiCamillo, The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane