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The King's Speech (2010) Review

by BenFranks


Author's note:

Spoiler! :
Copyright note: I have also posted this review on http://www.escapistmagazine.com under the username 'franksbnetwork'



The King's Speech



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2010, Weinstein Company & the UK Film Council



This movie has received much attention from the Golden Globes (nominated for 12 different awards), the British Academy Film Awards (nominated for 14 BAFTAs) and the Actors' Guild Awards as well as various others.



Now, usually with heavily nominated films - especially dramas - there is some disappointment or fall-down point because we were expecting something truly incredible, mind blowing in fact. The King's Speech doesn't disappoint. Throughout the film, the Director Tom Hooper gives us a wonderful experience. Everything is dressed up royal, feels royal and ceremonial duties are evident, but more importantly than that, Geoffrey Rush's character Lionel puts a wonderful reality twist to it all too. This movie keeps the ideals of family, support, love and living up to what you're expected to be but also beautifully portrays a person triumphing their self-doubt and fusing the spark to a new, confident self.



The movie follows the true story of King George V's death (played stylishly well by highly-regarded British actor Michael Gambon) and then the very short reign of King Edward VIII who pursuits womanizing as opposed to his duties as King and Head of the Church of England. Therefore the stammering younger brother, who in George V's last words described as "being more brave than all of his brothers combined" - although not to his face -, is announced as next in line to the throne. Bertie (Colin Firth), who later becomes crowned as King George VI, was trying to triumph his stammer and this is what the movie focuses on. It doesn't just illustrate the comical and inspiring things he does to get over his stammer, but instead dipicts a charming relationship as friends that develops between him and the commoner Lionel, who's played by Geoffrey Rush very well.



This allows the film to be more than what is expected of it. The small stories that are embedded in its narrative all boast their own tiny little moral meanings, there's a strong vibe of family importance echoed throughout and there's the triumphing of self-doubt and stunningly crafted relationship between commoner and King that glaces the cherry on top of this movie.



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An Originally Scripted Masterpiece



Tom Hooper, who directed the film, takes advantage of David Seidler's epic script in addressing atmosphere and a truthful edge to the film. The attention, at the beginning, does lapse quite slightly but as the film gets rolling around ten minutes in the characters begin to shine through with dialogue that shimmers gold in originality.



The King's Speech becomes more than what we had first perceived, as I've mentioned, and this is because of the large amount of subtle hints this movie has. You could pick up messages from the way people speak to one another, the way Bertie's life is slowly unfolding as he opens up to Lionel and also in the truthful event it is based on - the beginning and end show us events that preceded and exceeded what we see in the movie.



Of course, the ending is what we are all left on and this ending is a gem in itself. You really have to go and see the movie to appreciate it, but the way the characters are with one another, the place they're standing or the continual drive of atmosphere all come together to end with a feeling of mutual trust and respect. Emotionally and physically, this movie enhances your spirit of self belief.



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A Spirit Lifting and Dazzling Performance by Incredible Actors



Colin Firth and Helena Bonham-Carter almost imitate the relationship of Prince William and Kate Middleton in the way that the characters are in love. Family is enthasised through them both but not in a cheap portrayal. Everything is kept implicit with the actions they take toward one another and their two daughters Elizabeth and Margaret (who is played amusingly well by the young star from Outnumbered, watch out for the line: "You were splendid, Papa" it's rather hilarious!).



However, the stars of the casting clearly come from the relationship of Colin Firth's Bertie and Geoffrey Rush's Lionel. They're both very, very good actors and the way that they interact with each other at the start is comically hostile and rather amusing. Yet as the movie go on you can clearly see how these two develop into best of friends, into something that Bertie is almost filling a gap of absence for. The two portray the characters so well that it is almost impossible to see them being anything but King and self-trained Speech Therapist.



This movie brings together its elements in creating something unique and beautifully crafted. It bases it on a true event and works to the very hardest to inspire all of its audiences. I wasn't expecting to enjoy it that much (my initial views were that it would be average at best) but I was proved wrong. This is one of the best movies I have ever had the pleasure to go and see. I happily recommend it to all.



Overall:



The Storyline: 10/10 - Script is almost flawless, incredibly original

The Characters: 10/10 - Firth & Rush are masters of the trade

Music: 8/10 - Complimented the atmosphere beautifully, but nothing out of this world

Directing: 9/10 - Golden Globe goblin Tom Hooper doesn't fail to work his magic; incredible atmosphere throughout

Drama/Comic Rating: 9/10 - The drama never fails to lose your attention and the witty one-liners are so beautifully scripted that timing is priceless

Attention Rating: 9/10 - Slow start, but otherwise there's no lapse of attention



Rating: 55/60

"Worth Every Single Award You Can Throw At It"


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Tue Feb 15, 2011 9:42 pm
BenFranks says...



Welcome to YWS! :)




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Tue Feb 15, 2011 11:57 am



well...its a nice movie...saw it sometime back......yours is the first review i've read on YWS....




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Mon Feb 14, 2011 8:32 pm
BenFranks says...



I'm glad you liked it ;P

I don't know all too much about classical music, so I just based the scoring out of ten on how aesthetically pleasing it was - t'was good, but personally, nothing special. xD




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Mon Feb 14, 2011 3:00 am
Snoink wrote a review...



NO. The use of Mozart's Clarinet Concerto automatically makes the music 10/10. Maybe 11/10. I'm sorry, we must agree to disagree in this particular point.

And yeah. This was an awesome movie. I've seen it twice now and although I was getting a bit confused the first time (I wasn't sure what "abdicate" really meant, nor did I realize that Lionel had an Australian accent at first... little points that make a bit of a difference!) I hope it sweeps the Oscars! :D




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Sun Feb 13, 2011 11:17 pm
BenFranks says...



Very pleased with the BAFTA results! Congrats to The King's Speech ;D




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Sun Feb 13, 2011 6:08 am
Jennya says...



Nice review :D Will defiantly try to see this movie.





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