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Being a Teenage Christian.

by UnSocialCactus


Being a Christian adult and being a Christian teenager are two different things. Being a teenager is difficult as it is, but try adding your walk with the Lord and bunch of other teenagers that are meaner than snakes. For a teenager usually, it’s about striving for others’ approval, and being a Christian while doing that is a little difficult. In our generation, if you’re Christian and you follow God, you’re automatically- Stuck up, prude, arrogant, snobbish. People see you as someone to avoid as opposed to someone to be around. And this often happens with adults too. But for adults, you sometimes have options to get away from those kinds of people. Being a teenager- it’s not that easy. Take public school for example. You have to spend around seven hours around those who may persecute you. And in school, they have ample opportunity to criticize teenage Christians. With today’s technology and advanced ways of communication, it’s next to nothing to have access to any person. After a while, you might not even realize they’re a Christian. Why? Because as soon as they open their mouth’s to speak about God they’re shot down. Our generation is always quick to give chances to somebody different. Except for Christians. Double standard? Yeah. The society is against everything Christians are about. And teenagers around surrounded by society a lot more than you think. Social media, school, clubs, etc. So if society will give transgender bathrooms, queers, and Muslims a chance- Why not Christians?


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Fri Mar 30, 2018 3:30 pm
RobynTheWriter827 wrote a review...



I completely agree. As a Christian myself, this is all very relatable. Thankfully me and my friends don't get much hassle, as people don't really care that we go to SU (Scripture Union). They only care if we try to invite them along, which can be frustrating. This was a very good piece of writing, but sorting it into paragraphs would make it a bit easier to read. I like your use of the rhetorical question at the end, and overall I don't think there is much to improve on this piece.




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Wed Nov 08, 2017 10:15 pm
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Radrook wrote a review...



Thanks for sharing your experience as a Christian. Please note that Christians are advised not to associate with unbelievers for a reason. Satan will use unbelievers to tempt a Christian to fall into sin. So your situation as a teenager who needs friends and who needs to be socially accepted is indeed not easy.

First the answer to your last question is that those groups you mention as readily being accepted by the world fit right in with the world which is under the power of Satan while Christianity does not. So it is really no surprise. Jesus told us not to be surprised.

John 17:14
I have given them Your word and the world has hated them; for they are not of the world, just as I am not of the world.

About the essay itself, organizing it into paragraphs will greatly enhance its readability. Why not start a new paragraph with: “Take public school for example....”?




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Wed Nov 08, 2017 9:55 pm
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Panikos wrote a review...



Hi, UnSocialCactus! Pan here to review. I'll be taking the perspective of an agnostic on this, so it's a nice balance to TheBlueCat who is also a Christian.

I like that you've written this from the heart and tapped into something that a lot of people are afraid to say. I have to be honest, I do sometimes prejudge Christians. I'm quite critical of organised religion in general, so sometimes that clouds my preconceptions, though hopefully not my behaviour; all of the Christians I've known have been lovely people that I've had a lot of fun with. Your essay was good in that it reminded me to always question stereotypes, and it's a great message for all.

Nevertheless, I think there's a few things you could work on to make this a little more essay-like. It's quite anecdotal and subjective at the moment, and some of your points don't stand up to scrutiny. I'll keep it to three suggestions.

1) Develop your points a little more. You touch on how being a teenager is difficult in itself, but you don't really go into any detail about the difficulties - you mention striving for approval, but teenage life is tough for more reasons than that. It's a period of huge change, both socially and physically, and it's muddled in with self-discovery and immense academic pressure. You also never explain how Christians exactly are 'persecuted'. It's a very strong word to use without evidence, because it seems to suggest that Christians are actually being oppressed and prohibited from following their faith. What you describe in the piece, however, is more like prejudice. People stereotyping you due to your faith, while undoubtedly a problem, is not on a level with actual persecution.

So, in short, always back up your points. You flit from argument to argument quite quickly, and I think you could spend more time explaining your thought progression.

2) On a similar note, I'd like to see you take the article beyond just your own personal experience. While I don't think it's a bad thing to talk about your own perspective, it's pretty bold to make generalisations about the entire treatment of teenage Christians based purely on your own life. It would be like me insisting that misogyny didn't exist because I, a middle-class white woman living in a good area in a liberal country, has never been on the receiving end of it.

So you have two options. Number one, change the tone of the essay to focus only on your experience, and avoid making sweeping generalisations such as 'as soon as they open their mouth to speak about God they're shot down' and 'society is against everything Christians are about'. Instead, you could say that 'when I speak about God I am shot down' or 'my local community opposes Christian ideals', and then give examples of how. Or, if you fancy option two, you could look for more evidence from lots of different walks of life to support your argument. I'd argue you take the first option, because, in all honesty, I think it's a gross oversimplication to claim that Christianity is opposed in western society.

3) That brings me to my last point. At the end of the essay, you compare prejudice against Christians to prejudice against the LGBT+ community (I'd avoid using 'queers' in an essay, personally; some still consider it a slur) and Muslims. However, I truly don't think it's a good comparison. Society has been incredibly reluctant to accept the LGBT+ community; gay marriage has only been recently legalised in the US and Britain (LGBT relationships are still criminalised in a staggering 74 countries, and punishable by death in 13), and even in these 'liberal' nations, the fight for equality is still far from over. The transgender bathroom bill is also furiously debated, so to present it as unanimously accepted is simplistic at best and disrespectful at worst.

Muslims are also under incredible scrutiny in modern society. Less than a year ago, Trump was calling to ban them from the United States. Hate crimes targeting UK mosques have doubled in the last year, spiking in response to recent terror attacks. This is stereotyping and prejudice at its worst.

This, for me, is the most blatant flaw in your argument. You're calling for Christians to be accepted like the LGBT+ and Muslim communities are, but those communities aren't accepted - in Western societies, they're more oppressed than Christianity is. While I completely agree that stereotyping anyone for their faith is wrong, it is not comparable to falling victim to hate crimes and having your very existence criminalised. As such, you need to make sure you're comparing like with like.

I'll leave the review here. I did enjoy reading this, but be careful not to make generalisations based on very little evidence. You need to consider all sides of an argument before you form any conclusions. I don't doubt that being a teenage Christian can be an uncomfortable, conflicting experience for many, but the full picture - like everything in life - is complicated, and a good essay will acknowledge that. There's no shame in saying that the issue isn't black and white.

Keep writing! :D
~Pan




TheBlueCat says...


Yeah, I know nothing about (3, I live under a rock! xD



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TheBlueCat wrote a review...



Hullo UnSocialCactus! Cat here to review this awesome little essay! Okay then, here we go! :D

First, let's go through your piece together:

Spoiler! :
Being a Christian adult and being a Christian teenager are two different things. (So true! My mom doesn't quite understand this)Being a teenager is difficult as it is (Yup...), but try adding your walk with the Lord and bunch of other teenagers that are meaner than snakes. For a teenager usually, it’s about striving for others’ approval (Not always, but I get your point!), and being a Christian while doing that is a little difficult. In our generation, if you’re Christian and you follow God, you’re automatically- Stuck up, prude, arrogant, snobbish (I'm not sure if this is only for christian teens, but it sounds like just a lot of normal teens). People see you as someone to avoid as opposed to someone to be around (Except for at the grocery store and a ton of random people decide that the isle you're in is the one they need to be in right now! xD). And this often happens with adults too. But for adults, you sometimes have options to get away from those kinds of people. Being a teenager- it’s not that easy. Take public school for example. You have to spend around seven hours around those who may persecute you (And you don't have a choice about it...). And in school, they have ample opportunity to criticize teenage Christians. With today’s technology and advanced ways of communication, it’s next to nothing to have access to any person (This sentence is worded kinda weird and it's hard to understand what you're trying to say). After a while, you might not even realize they’re a Christian. Why? Because as soon as they open their mouth’s to speak about God they’re shot down (Truth! But sometimes after being shot down once, they are too discouraged to try again :(). Our generation is always quick to give chances to somebody different. Except for Christians. Double standard? Yeah.(YEAH!!) The society is against everything Christians are about. And teenagers around surrounded by society a lot more than you think. Social media, school, clubs, etc. So if society will give transgender bathrooms, queers, and Muslims a chance- Why not Christians? (That's my question!!)


What I liked: The whole thing!! I can relate to it so much as a christian teenager myself!

What to fix/improve:Not really anything I could see! :D

Other random comments:This is so great!! You really spoke truth in this!

Well anyways, awesome short essay thing! Great job and keep writing! :D





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