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Concerto for Flute

by Snoink


You know she's a flutist because
she strikes up to join the rest of her band
with her shoulders powdery white and
bare despite il maestro's orders.
But nobody minds and all eyes turn to her
watching how her long dress skates at her heels
and her frilly bodice clutches her chest.
When she tunes, she doesn't play, instead
her lips touch its place and she breathes
as if the gold will melt
when she plays forte con passione.

Leggero now....

No one can match the way her breasts move
en sposina
with each breath she takes
as she sings sweetly on silver.
Even the brass quiet as she begins her solo--
the clarinet squeak is unnoticed.

Pianissimo crescendo a forte
The gold doesn't melt, but
her face lights up as if music has
ignited her soul.

Tu canta dolcemente, mia amore.


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Fri May 09, 2008 8:12 pm
lin night wrote a review...



Snoink wrote:No one can match the way her breasts move
en sposina
with each breath she takes
as she sings sweetly on silver.


this is pretty generic, pretty predictable. lots of description but little poetry. not much emotional or thematic substance. the quote is the only part i really liked.

don't try so hard: throw out some words, and let the poetry come naturally.




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Mon Apr 28, 2008 7:18 am
deleted6 wrote a review...



Very nice Karina. I felt music from this as i read each line I heard a flute. I6t's rather odd as I'm listening to rock and punk lmao. Damn my tangents. The way you incorporated the musical terms into a poem. That is an ingenius and highly original idea. But the one problem was some of the description stagnated this slightly slowed it down. You need to think how to make it all the more musical. Overall: Brilliant idea but overkill on the description.

Good luck
VSN




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Mon Apr 28, 2008 4:39 am
Snoink says...



The word "il" is actually "the" in Italian, describing a masculine object, such as a maestro. So no, not a typo. ^^




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Mon Apr 28, 2008 12:01 am
Summerless wrote a review...



This is unique. I love how you incorporated words like "leggero" and "pianissimo" and "forte" into the poem--it truly makes it sound more beautiful.
Also, I like how you brought up the part about the gold in the beginning and in the end of the poem. You started something and you finished it. Very nice.

One clarification: Did you put "bare despite il maestro's orders" on purpose? or was the "il" part a typo?


This is a lovely piece and I can picture a classical piece playing in my mind when I read this. Well written and a 9.7 out of 10.




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Sat Apr 26, 2008 5:38 pm
sweetcapris wrote a review...



This is beautiful writing! It is so fluid, so elegant, and so soft. But just when I was really into this melted vat of elegant language, the line--- "the clarinet squeak goes unnoticed"

It really threw me off. It pulled me from the subject and left me thinking- if it was unnoticed, why did it jerk me from beautifully lulling music

By drawing our attention to this flaw so suddenly and unexpectedly, it IS noticed.

If it was a bit of humor that we were shooting for, sure, it might work. I just felt it was a little jolting and it's what I remember after reading the whole poem.

Now that THAT is mentioned, haha, the rest was absolutely lovely. I liked the musical references and how I could imagine each one flowing throughout the poem. :]




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Fri Apr 25, 2008 10:57 pm
CK Lynn wrote a review...



I really liked this!

You know she's a flutist because
she strikes up to join the rest of her band(the band, perhaps?)
with her shoulders powdery white and
bare despite il maestro's orders. (il?)
But nobody minds and all eyes turn to her
watching how her long dress skates at her heels
and her frilly bodice clutches her chest.
When she tunes, she doesn't play, instead
her lips touch its place and she breathes
as if the gold will melt (beautiful line)
when she plays forte con passione.

Leggero now....

No one can match the way her breasts move
en sposina
with each breath she takes
as she sings sweetly on silver. (the precious metal refrences are nice)
Even the brass quiet as she begins her solo--
the clarinet squeak is unnoticed.

Pianissimo crescendo a forte
The gold doesn't melt, but (not so fond of this line)
her face lights up as if music has
ignited her soul.

Tu canta dolcemente, mia amore. (sweetness)




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Thu Apr 24, 2008 6:36 pm
isurelyluvu wrote a review...



Hi! I thought this was a very good poem. It was very descriptive and you used pretty language. I'm an oboeist (is that what it's called? Oboeist sounds funny). We have tons of flutists in our band. They sound very pretty! :D

PS: I didn't really understand parts like leggero and en sposina.




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Wed Apr 23, 2008 10:30 pm
harrypotterbooklover101 says...



LOVE IT case I'm a flute player!




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Tue Mar 11, 2008 9:02 pm
backgroundbob wrote a review...



Ah, the conceited flautist. Give me that clarinet squeak any day.

I don't really have much of a critique for you: there are probably little nitpicks of rhythm or language I could find if I looked really hard, but I like this too much to abuse it :) The tension between knowing she is admired and truly shining in the spotlight is... interesting. Keep it up, m'dear, you've got truckloads of talent.




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Tue Mar 11, 2008 7:25 pm
Adnamarine wrote a review...



This has to be one of the best things I've read on YWS for a while, seriously!
I am a musician, and I loved how you used the musical terms.
This was really beautiful.

Snoink wrote:Pianissimo crescendo a forte
The gold doesn't melt, but
her face lights up as if music has
ignited her soul.

This lines are my favorite.

The way you describe the music is so unique and perfect and so true.
When you read it aloud everything seems heavy (in a good way) and the words just glide out so seemlessly.


*adna*




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Tue Mar 11, 2008 6:01 am
Snoink says...



:P

I forgot not all people were musicians. Oh well!

Leggero = lightly

sposina = a light bridal dance

And yeah... thanks for all the comments so far!




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Tue Mar 11, 2008 12:31 am
Leja wrote a review...



You know she's a flutist


I despise you now :P (kidding)


I didn't like most of it. A lot of the phrases seemed written only to support the musical phrases within them, and although I know all the words, it didn't feel very musical to me, and phrases like this one:

Pianissimo crescendo a forte
The gold doesn't melt, but
her face lights up as if music has
ignited her soul.


seemed heavy on verbs for description rather than description for description.

BUT!

I loved the ending line:

Tu canta dolcemente, mia amore.


It was beautifully placed, and for some reason, I really like it especially because it's in italics? But anyway. What sets this line apart from the rest of the poem is that it seems written more sweetly or carefully or something. "Sing" is used in place of "play" which is a nice touch, especially given the other languageness of it. But there's a stark contrast between this line and the rest of the poem. Look to the simplistic elegance of this phrase if you choose to edit.

Happy writing!




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Tue Mar 11, 2008 12:21 am
SimonCowellLuver wrote a review...



Leggero now....

No one can match the way her breasts move
en sposina
with each breath she takes
as she sings sweetly on silver.
Even the brass quiet as she begins her solo--
the clarinet squeak is unnoticed

Ello Its SCL or simoncowellluver whatever you wanna call me. Ok you got a good thing going on here but you have some mistakes.
Let me start with what is "Leggero?"
I don't even think "en sposina" is even a language. LOL
Alright back to business. after "move" ypou need a comma and after "en sposina" you need a period.
I think "unnoticed" is spelled wrong but i can be wrong. It just don't look right to me.

After "unnoticed" you need a period.

Oh I forgot one after "takes" you need a comma.



Pianissimo crescendo a forte need a period.
The gold doesn't melt,
her face lights up as if music has you need a period here.
ignited her soul.

I like your poem got some few mistakes though Good luck with your writing.
If you have any questions feel free to PM me anytime.
Good day
SCL/SimonCowellLuver




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Mon Mar 10, 2008 10:28 pm
yoha_ahoy wrote a review...



Oh lovely! Hooray flutes! Great use of musical terms in there, though I haven't even heard of half of them. XD The only thing I think would sound better would change the line to, "as she sweetly sings on silver." It just sounds better. Great piece. Now I want to write one about my oboe... but knowing how an oboe sounds like, my poem would end up sounding like a dying duck apparently. Haha!




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Mon Mar 10, 2008 10:21 am
summergrl13 says...



I really enjoyed this piece Snoink! This is awesome and I hope that you'll be writing more sbout this! This was pretty unique and mysterious as it left me hanging to every word! Keep it up! 0(o.o)0





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