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Shakespeare

by Sam


Ever read Shakespeare? I'm partway through Romeo and Juliet...kinda confusing language, but it's quite beautiful when you look at it. Although it leads to provoking thoughts. *lol* since the actors were all guys in Shakespeare's time, what did they do for when Romeo kisses Juliet upon several occasions? hmmm...:D


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Fri Oct 19, 2012 8:42 pm
mb1221 wrote a review...



Shakespeare and beautiful??? hmmm, think about it again :D and a really good question you have, because I have been wondering this too, since I hate shakespearean plays and I think that his plays and language have no meaning at all... Good point tho, liked it! Oh, and I like Macbeth as well...




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Sun Mar 05, 2006 3:37 am
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Duskglimmer wrote a review...



I haven't read many of them, but I think that Macbeth has to be my favorite so far.

I love trying to explain to people that haven't read it that Macbeth is actually a guy and that's it's actually Lady Macbeth that is the person they're thinking of.




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Sun Mar 05, 2006 3:20 am
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Fishr wrote a review...



I've only read two Shakespeare plays. Between R&J and A Midsummer's Night Dream; Midsummer's Night's Dream was ten times better. It's an awesome story by far but it's been a long time since I've read it. The only thing that stands out in my head is when a fairy(I think)changes a guys head into a donkey, lol. And he's completely unaware of it.




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Sun Feb 26, 2006 10:10 pm
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I have it on tape somewheres...

"Adam, why do you think every women in Shakesphere wears hideously ugly wigs, and barfs everywhere?" (paraphrased from The Reduced Shakespeare Company's The Complete Works of William Shakespeare)




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Sun Feb 26, 2006 8:08 pm
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Areida says...



I've seen clips. It's great! :D




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Sun Feb 26, 2006 7:24 pm
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Caligula's Launderette wrote a review...



I've almost read through the gamut of his plays or atleast the ones in my Works of Shakespeare edition. My favorites would have to be Macbeth, Taming of the Shrew, Julius Caeser, Hamlet, Much Ado About Nothing, The Merchant of Venice, Merry Wives of Windsor, Othello, Richard III, and The Tempest.

Romeo and Juliet is destested because a. it's part of the school circulum, I had to read it twice for class, once in 5th grade, the other freshmen year; and b. not many people want to sit and disect something for class, especially as a freshman, I know I totally tuned out. Plus Romeo and Juliet isn't one of his best plays in my opinion, and it's over done, pounded into kid's heads everywhere. But I have to say Mercutio's monologue about Queen Mab is some good stuff.

If I had to pick an absolute favorite it would be Much Ado About Nothing, the word-play in it is amazing. Shakespeare was a true wordsmith; true he borrowed from classic greek and roman plays, and when he found a template that worked he used it over and over again. It is also very interesting to see the effect of monarchy on his works. Almost each play ends with the ruler (king, prince, duke...) cleaning up the mess, and putting everything right again.

On another note, has anyone here seen The Reduced Shakespeare Company? :D




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Sun Feb 26, 2006 4:43 pm
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I haven't read Julius Cesear - I read most of his work though.
I really didn't like Hamlet...I found it really quite odd, and in the same kind of vein as Macbeth, except I liked that.




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Sun Feb 26, 2006 4:24 pm
Areida wrote a review...



It's funny when you think about a lot of books censured from kids high school and below, and yet they still read Shakespeare. He was so bawdy.

I've read Hamlet, MacBeth, parts of Romeo and Juliet and Julius Caesar. MacBeth is my favourite of his so far; it's such a great story.




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Sun Feb 26, 2006 3:54 pm
Rei says...



Yeah, it's really funny how much disguised swearing there is in his plays.




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Sun Feb 26, 2006 10:59 am
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Whatsarahsaid says...



I've read romeo and J last year and have just finished Macbeth in English class. I prefer Macbeth because it's grittier and nastier language.




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Fri Dec 02, 2005 10:07 am
Nis says...



The only Shakespeare I liked was A Midsummer Night's Dream and Twelfth Night.

I hate Romeo and Juliet! *dies*




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Fri Dec 02, 2005 1:09 am
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zelithon says...



I love Shakespeare.
"all the worlds a stage..."




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Thu Sep 15, 2005 4:28 am
Melodie wrote a review...



I read Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth, and Julius Ceasar. I read R&J in ninth grade and our english teacher had us rewrite the first scene of the first act into modern day terms. We had the freedom to change all the situations and places in any way we wanted as long as the same theme was present. I had a lot of fun with mine. I always wanted to do the whole thing and convert it from stageplay to screenplay but I never did.
Macbeth and Julius Ceasar were alright but the english teacher I had those ones with didn't let us get anywhere near as into them.




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Sat Sep 10, 2005 4:44 pm
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Bjorn says...



They're good, but I prefer them when acted out. For that's what they were originally intended for no? The language can be confusing, but a read through again and again, can get one used to it.




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Fri Sep 09, 2005 3:39 pm
Beethoven wrote a review...



Much Ado About Nothing and The Twelve Night are my favorites, though I do like several others.
I saw the former in theatre at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. So hilarious.

And I think Romeo and Juliet is so overdone. It isn't that romantic, people. >.>




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Fri Sep 09, 2005 3:21 pm
Fool wrote a review...



I've read MacBeth and Romeo and Juliet, both for english in the same year *dies* it was hard going and hard reading, but once you get past the language it's such a good story and there's a lot you can say about it, (hence why i spent half of year 10 writing essays) I really enjoyed them, but they haven't made me want to pick up another one of his plays.




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Fri Sep 09, 2005 9:49 am
Nox says...



I have to agree with Djinni, I liked Macbeth but didn't like Romeo and Juliet.




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Wed Sep 07, 2005 12:16 pm
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Djinni wrote a review...



I've read Hamlet, Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth, Taming the Shrew and Much Ado About Nothing (or whatever) and although the language was a bit confusing to understand I really enjoyed them. My favourite has to be Macbeth and my least favourite is Romeo and Juliet.




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Fri Aug 19, 2005 11:57 am
Akisha wrote a review...



We studied Romeo and Juliet in school. It was a little confusing at first but you get used to it after a while and it became very enjoyable.

I also read a book which was Hamlet turned into a novel. It was written from the princesses point of view(can't remember her name) and it was really good. Because it was written like a normal novel, it was easy to follow and was more to the point than the play. When i read this it showed how brilliant his ideas are, even though it was written by somebody else.




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Wed Feb 09, 2005 6:42 am
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Tara says...



We did this whole section on Shakespeare (The frothy drink, lol, right Crysi?) my freshmen year. This one guy in our class kept translating it to...very simple terms, lol.




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Sun Feb 06, 2005 9:10 pm
Sam says...



it's painfully obvious




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Sun Feb 06, 2005 12:00 pm
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Firestarter says...



I'm not even a Shakespeare fan and I know it's from Hamlet, Sam.




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Sun Feb 06, 2005 5:48 am
Sam says...



I've never actually seen it...just read it.

where do you think I got my sig, all you shakespeare fans? (the last line)




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Sun Feb 06, 2005 5:28 am
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Nate says...



I saw Romeo and Juliet for the first time today at the Folger Shakespeare Theatre in DC, and it was very disappointing. The play was boring, and just seemed way too excessive in parts. Of course, Romeo and Juliet is also the only Shakespeare play that I hate, so I am a bit biased.

Although, I think it may just be the Folger; it's never all that good. From now on, I'll just go to the Shakespeare Theater, where they'll be showing the Tempest this March :)




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Sat Feb 05, 2005 9:07 pm
Rei says...



Sorry Nate. Silly Brad. I never asked you to shut up. How American of you to twist things so they make you look like the better person even when you're not (including cases where nobody is right or wrong)

Anyway, here's something more on topic

Oh Reason not the need Our based beggars are in their poorest thing superfluous. Allow not nature more than nature needs Thou art a lady If only to go warm were gorgeous.
Why nature need not what thou gorgeous wearest Which scarcely keeps you warm but for true need Hevean, Give me that patience, patience I need You see me hear you gods a poor old man as full as greif as age, wretched in both If it be you who stirs these daughters hearts agaist their Father fool me not so much to bear it tamely Touch me with noble anger and let not womens weapons, Water drops, stain my mans cheeks No you unnatural hags. I will have such vengance on you both For all the world to... I shall do such things, what they are yet, I know not, but they shall be the terrors of the earth. You think I'll weep. No, I'll ot weep.
King Lear, Act two, scene four

Wrote that out from memory myself. Hand to perform it for my English class once.




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Thu Feb 03, 2005 6:24 pm
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Nate says...



Keep it on topic.




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Thu Feb 03, 2005 6:16 pm
Incandescence says...



Hehe. If you really wanted me to shutup, you wouldn't have responded at all.




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Thu Feb 03, 2005 6:08 pm
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Rei says...



I really don't think you could. In the past when you have suggested we stop arguing, you have immediately started again when (from the wayyou I saw it) felt confident that you could win. Besides, there is no rule her about not expanding on other people's posts.




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Thu Feb 03, 2005 5:44 pm
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Incandescence says...



It just asked for our humble opinions. I'm not going to prove you wrong, Rei. You don't like me, I don't like you. So, until we settle our immature differences, I think it would be best if we just stopped antagonizing each other, especially since you really want me to stop talking to you.




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Thu Feb 03, 2005 5:26 pm
Rei says...



Oh yeah. One more thing. if Shakespeare is so terrible, why has he remained so popular for hundreds of years? I love the language (but I also love the stories, Nate, and how he used them) Besides, even if he was appealing only the the body, is there anything wrong with that?

I can't wait until I can play Kate in Taming of the Shew. It's such a fun role.




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Thu Feb 03, 2005 5:08 pm
Nate wrote a review...



Actually, it has been side many times that if Shakespeare had written his plays today, he would've been called a plagerist. Only a couple of his plays were completely original, and some of his famous plays, such as Romeo and Juliet, borrow almost entire sections from the work of previous playwrights.

However, it is not the story-line nor the ideas that keep us reading Shakespeare; it's the language. Nearly every single one of his plays is timeless, and his plays contain speeches and dialogue that is absolutely genius. And while the plots are not original, he presented them in a way that brought them a fresh face such that people forgot who first wrote the story of Hamlet.

In any case, I love Shakespeare. He's definitely the reason why the English language is the best language on Earth :)




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Thu Feb 03, 2005 4:54 pm
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Rei wrote a review...



I see one person here has called Shakespeare a copy-cat. Maybe so. Maybe he did borrow ideas and story-lines. But who doesn't? Are the fanatsy novelists who delve into fairy-tales and mythology any less worthwhile because they do retellings rather than write "original" stories? Or the writers who retell historical events? No, they are not. I love reading the many interpretations of classic stories and reimaginings of popular fairytales and myths. We all borrow, and we are all influenced by others. What matters is not what ideas we have, or where we got them, but how we use them. Shakespeare was a genius. He is the greatest playwright in the English language to ever live, and possible the greatest writer n general. He really did include crowd-pleasers and things that screenwriters do today. Stuff that was added not because it was brilliant, but because that was what the audience of the time wanted. If you know how to read it, you'd be amazed by how much swearing there is in some of his plays.




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Sat Jan 29, 2005 1:57 am
QiGuaiGongFu says...



im related to Dunkan! i hail from the Macnaughten Clan, who held castle Fife some time before Dunkan came along.




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Sat Jan 29, 2005 1:39 am
Meshugenah says...



Yes! Shakespere is poetry, and sometimes it does take time to understand! I don't think his charactizations are that bad. Honestly, Lady macbeth is hilarious (well, not intended, but still...) and Romeo and Juliet, there were so many innaprotiate references in it i was amazed they have you read it in english! One must connect the dots, and i think many don't like reading his plays becuase of that; they'd rather have everything handed to them on a silver platter with every little reference already researched and analized.

Also, when read correctly, shakespere is the most beautliful thing! My friend was practining hamelet's soliloquy, and it was really good. Such a difference from the people that read in english class. It can take work to understand it, but i think it's worth it. He may get.. tedious, at times, but there is so much (well, me at least) that i can learn when i read it. I can't explain it exactly, but i love it.




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Fri Jan 28, 2005 7:16 am
QiGuaiGongFu wrote a review...



Incan. WTF are you talking about? Everybody re-tells or incorporates old stories into their own literature. the last new plot was used up before written language. incorporating mythology into stories has been popular for as long as we've been out of new plots.
shaksperian writing sounds nothing like greek and roman liturature. shakespear was a poet, it takes work to understand shakespear. no greek or roman would have apreciated doing work on their off time. romans hated doing work on their on time. when you can write an original hamlet quality play, in a fortnight, then you'll have some room to complain.
your allowed to re-tell stories, people do it all the time. movies are constantly remade in later years with or without the same title.




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Fri Jan 28, 2005 6:48 am
Galatea wrote a review...



I love Shakespeare. I want to join the Royal Shakespeare Company in London and become a Shakespearean actor. There is nothing I love more in this world than Shakespearean literature. Maybe my mother. You know how there are certain things that thrill you? Writing, or reading a good book, perhaps. Maybe it's sports, or maybe bungee jumping. Maybe you like the thrill of roller coasters, or the rush of adrenaline after a tattoo. Me? I live for the thrill of theatre. Everything about it excites me. The wave of silence after curtain on closing night, the exhiliration of sharing yourself body and soul to a house full of mostly strangers, and words. Words, most of all, are what complete the sensation for me. I don't care whose they are, if the show is well written, it's ultimate, sacred, untouchable. In my life, there is nothing more pure and unadulterated than Shakespeare's words. Reading his language is like seeing the sky for the first time, hearing it is like being touched just right, and speaking it? If there is better I have yet to experience. The words caress my voice and pallet, roll off mytongue and linger upon the air. They hang on my lips like a kiss held just a moment longer than necessary. It's my opiate. My drug. My addiction. My salvation.

It's a hard thing to understand, especially if you don't care for him. But Shakespeare is going to be my life's devotion. The man was a genius, and I'd appreciate a little respect for his artistry.




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Fri Jan 28, 2005 6:35 am
hawk wrote a review...



I had to read Shakespeare for school as well, English last year. Really, I'm not much of a fan. I'd much rather read a book by an author who gets to the point, without dancing around silly words. His characters were boring, and the whole thing was too long-winded. With all that descriptiveness and silly small-talk, what happened to the romanticizing?

Why not Hemingway?




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Sat Jan 22, 2005 6:40 am
bubblewrapped wrote a review...



Well nuts to you Incandescence. Personally, I like Shakespeare, but only when I'm studying the plays. I like going into depth and looking at overall theme and stuff. Its a lot more boring when I'm just reading it on my own. I've read Romeo & Juliet, Macbeth and Hamlet so far, but seen movies of quite a lot else (best way to learn the plays if you ask me, LOL). Never managed to get to a play of one though [makes mental note to seek out theatre that plays Shakespeare] I recently did a project on who Shakespeare actually was, or might have been...fascinating stuff! (for those of you who want more info, look up "shakespeare authorship question" on your favourite search engine for some interesting websites). So I guess you could say I'm a fan hehe. It depends on my mood though, and the play. Sometimes I adore Shakespeare. Other times I'm like...zzzz...




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Sat Jan 22, 2005 6:36 am
Crysi wrote a review...



Meshugenah wrote:
Firestarter wrote:I've read Macbeth and R&J in school.

R&J is priceless for it's sexual innuendos, we went into far too much depth with them.


My teacher didn't explain much of it, thank god. Unfortunately, that ment I was cracking up through half the play, while everyone around me had this blank stare on their faces. It was rather amusing during this one monoluge of Juliet's..It was wrong. Extreamly wrong.


I think I know which part you're talking about..

OOH! Remember the hilarious rant Mercutio goes on? Unfortunately, I wasn't playing him at the time.. but I played him a few other times. Best character ever. :D




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Sat Jan 22, 2005 5:44 am
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Incandescence wrote a review...



Shakespeare was nothing more than a copycat. All of his so-called fame came from the theft of theatrics from the Greeks and the Romans. His style of writing is not appealing to the senses and the mind, but to the body, and that is the reason I wholeheartedly hate Shakespeare or those who try to mimic him.




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Sat Jan 22, 2005 5:41 am
Meshugenah says...



Firestarter wrote:I've read Macbeth and R&J in school.

R&J is priceless for it's sexual innuendos, we went into far too much depth with them.


My teacher didn't explain much of it, thank god. Unfortunately, that ment I was cracking up through half the play, while everyone around me had this blank stare on their faces. It was rather amusing during this one monoluge of Juliet's..It was wrong. Extreamly wrong.




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Fri Jan 21, 2005 7:20 pm
Wulie wrote a review...



I've read both macbeth and romeo and juliet - due to school. I really disliked macbeth though this could be because I read it in year 9 and my attention span was very short to say the least, plus the tracher hated me to the extreme. However I quite liked Romeo and juliet though I do agree challenenging to read at times, but the words a quite beautiful. *AH* I never thought I'd be saying I liked shakespear *hits self*
Wu x




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Fri Jan 21, 2005 4:16 pm
Firestarter says...



I've read Macbeth and R&J in school.

R&J is priceless for it's sexual innuendos, we went into far too much depth with them.




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Fri Jan 21, 2005 5:18 am
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Bobo wrote a review...



I don't really see why people like Shakespeare so much; his writing doesn't impress me too much. Pretty imaginative ideas, though. Anyway, the best thing about studying him in 10th grade was that we got to see Shakespeare in a Nutshell or something like that, where they did the plays really fast and it was hilarious. Especially at the end when they did a bunch of them together and got them all mixed up and such. Fun stuff.




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Fri Jan 21, 2005 5:13 am
Meshugenah wrote a review...



We read R&J last year in english. apparently i was the only one that found it funny. Now we're reading macbeth. lady macbeth is... different to say the least. macbeth is a bot of a whimp, and the witches have the best parts! lol great fun it is to read shakesphere!

omg niteowl, act three scene one, i was supposed to play tybalt! the guy who ended up playing him literally could not read. he's soo... what's the word, over the top reckless aristrocate! lol and irrevent! *ahem*




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Fri Jan 21, 2005 3:32 am
niteowl wrote a review...



We've read it for school on more than one occasion. One time our LA teacher gave a special treat: get out of school and go to Stratford, Canada and see "The Taming of The Shrew." One catch: We had to read the play first. It was boring and the language was confusing. But once you see it in play format, it's so hilarious! Though it was a little odd they were using old language and Italian place names but the setting was western. Whatever.

Later that year we read Romeo and Juliet. We acted it out as we did it. For Act Three, we split into groups and twisted them. Me and my friend had Act Three, Scene One (that's the scene where Tybalt kills Mercutio and Romeo kills Tybalt), and we were with a bunch of guys! We did it "D-town" style. The Montagues were East Side druggies and the Capulets were West Side drug dealers. We had graffiti paper as a backdrop.

It got weirder in Scene Two (which is kind of romantic). That group was all guys. They ended up thumb wrestling. :-s

Anyway, my basic take is, reading is boring, but watching's pretty cool.





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