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no name, needs title

by Keowyn


*hi everyone! i decided to do that write a novel in a year thing and this is the beginning of it. not much here though, as it's not complete. wan't sure if it should be here or in other fiction so i'll post it there too.*

Kathrynne loved the sensation of wind flying in her hair. It tugged at her wet, stringy brown hair and flung it into cat green eyes. From her perch in the sycamore tree, the sensation was even more thrilling.

She laughed, and threw her jacket down. There was no need for it with the warmth of an early autumn evening. As the wind died down, Kathrynne plucked a leaf from her hair. She frowned; this was strange. The leaf was that of an oak, and there were none of those in her back yard. She shrugged it off and jumped down, with the agility of a cat also.

School had started back a week ago, landing Kathrynne in the seventh grade, and a different school: McCallister Middle School. There had been friends to make, and teachers to meet. The school was everything Kathrynne and her best friend Saree had dreamed about, and more. But after a week of hard work, she found herself wishing more and more that school could have started even later.

She shook her head, and went inside. "Upstairs, Mom!" she said as she flew through the kitchen. Her mother nodded vaguely, hands furiously kneading bread dough. Kathrynne smiled. Homemade bread was her favorite.

Kathryyne stopped at the top of the stairs, panting. She walked into the office, where her dad was looking at stamps through a magnifying glass. He looked up from his work and grinned widely, wild brown hair falling into his face like a young boy's.

"Hey, Dad. Working on your collection?" Kathrynne asked.

"Yeah. I've got a wonderful stamp from the 1850's. Wanna look?" he said. Kathrynne sighed, and shuffled over. The stamp was of George Washington, with a very faint cancelation.

"Wow. Cool. Do you have my Elvis stamp yet?" she said. Dad raised an eyebrow. Kathrynne wasn't a stamp collector, more like an Elvis collecter. She had purses, shirts, CD's. She even had some old records her grandma had given her. An Elvis stamp would be a nice addition.

Her father handed Kathrynne an envelope. She squealed and ripped it open. Then her smile turned to a frown. This wasn't an Elvis stamp! It was a stamp with strange cirles on it, curving together intricately and weaving together.

"This isn't my stamp, Dad." Kathrynne handed it back to him. He looked at it over his glasses and frowned. Then he smiled.

"Sorry, sweetie. I gave you the wrong envelope. He handed another envelpe to Kathrynne, adn this time when she ripped it open her Elvis stamp was there. Giving her father aquick hug, she ran to her room.

Kathrynne's room, to say the least, was covered in posters. Not just Elvis posters, but posters from movies and such. A few of her drawings were scattered on her bed and nightstand. The Elvis screenssaver from her computer flashed brightly.

Moaning, she flopped onto her bed. "Doo dee dum day and tickety tock," she sang. It was a 'song' she and Saree had made up as toddlers. Whenever they were relieved they sang it. She scooped up a cat off of her pillow, and let it onto the floor with a loud meow. Kathrynne found her battered black notebook and flipped it open to write.

Suddenly, a suffocating darkness enveloped the room. Kathrynne could still feel the notebook and pencil in her clenched hands. She opened her mouth to scream, then closed it as the light reappeared.

"Curious," she said, quoting from Alice in Wonderland.

"Very curious indeed," a new voice said. Kathrynne jumped.

A very short girl with thin legs sat on the side of her bed. Kathrynne's hands flew to her mouth.

"How did- how did- youbalbaasniggle," Kathrynne said. The girl laughed.

"I love playing that Faerie trick! Tongue-Tied, it's called. Anyways, I'm here to learn you the ways of the Old country," she said.

"OldabibCountrabab?" Kathrynne asked, as red embarassment seeped into her cheeks.

"Yes, the old country. I'll come again tomorrow. By the way, I'm Lekksi," the Faerie girl said. Lekksi clapped her hands and was gone, leaving Kathrynne in the most puzzled manner.


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Fri Feb 17, 2006 1:31 pm
Keowyn says...



i'll have the rest this afternoon.




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29 Reviews


Points: 890
Reviews: 29

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Fri Feb 17, 2006 1:29 pm
Keowyn says...



Kathrynne loved the sensation of wind flying in her hair. It tugged at her wet, stringy brown hair and flung it into cat green eyes. From her perch in the sycamore tree, the sensation was even more thrilling.



She laughed, and threw her jacket down. There was no need for it with the warmth of an early autumn evening. As the wind died down, Kathrynne plucked a leaf from her hair. She frowned; this was strange. The leaf was that of an oak, and there were none of those in her back yard. She shrugged it off and jumped down, with the agility of a cat also.



School had started back a week ago, landing Kathrynne in the seventh grade, and a different school: McCallister Middle School. There had been friends to make, and teachers to meet. The school was everything Kathrynne and her best friend Saree had dreamed about, and more. But after a week of hard work, she found herself wishing more and more that school could have started even later.



She shook her head, and went inside. "Upstairs, Mom!" she said as she flew through the kitchen. Her mother nodded vaguely, furiously kneading bread dough. Kathrynne smiled. Homemade bread was her favorite.



Kathryyne stopped at the top of the stairs, panting. She walked into the office, where her dad was looking at stamps through a magnifying glass. He looked up from his work and grinned widely, wild brown hair falling into his face like a young boy's.



"Hey, Dad. Working on your collection?" Kathrynne asked.
"Yeah. I've got a wonderful stamp from the 1850's. Wanna look?" he said. Kathrynne sighed, and shuffled over. The stamp was of George Washington, with a very faint cancelation.



"Wow. Cool. Do you have my Elvis stamp yet?" she said. Dad raised an eyebrow. Kathrynne wasn't a stamp collector, more like an Elvis collecter. She had purses, shirts, CD's. She even had some old records her grandma had given her. An Elvis stamp would be a nice addition.



Her father handed Kathrynne an envelope. She squealed and ripped it open. Then her smile turned to a frown. This wasn't an Elvis stamp! It was a stamp with strange cirles on it, curving together intricately and weaving together.



"This isn't my stamp, Dad." Kathrynne handed it back to him. He looked at it over his glasses and frowned. Then he smiled.
"Sorry, sweetie. I gave you the wrong envelope." He handed another envelope to Kathrynne, and this time when she ripped it open her Elvis stamp was there. Giving her father a quick hug, she ran to her room.



Kathrynne's room, to say the least, was covered in posters. Not just Elvis posters, but posters from movies and such. A few of her drawings were scattered on her bed and nightstand. The Elvis screenssaver from her computer flashed brightly.



Moaning, she flopped onto her bed. "Doo dee dum day and tickety tock," she sang. It was a 'song' she and Saree had made up as toddlers. Whenever they were relieved they sang it. She scooped up a cat off of her pillow, and let it onto the floor with a loud meow. Kathrynne found her battered black notebook and flipped it open to write.



Suddenly, a suffocating darkness enveloped the room. Kathrynne could still feel the notebook and pencil in her clenched hands. She opened her mouth to scream, then closed it as the light reappeared.



"Curious," she said, quoting from Alice in Wonderland.
"Very curious indeed," a new voice said. Kathrynne jumped.



A very short girl with thin legs sat on the side of her bed. Kathrynne's hands flew to her mouth.
"How did- how did- youbalbaasniggle," Kathrynne said. The girl laughed.
"I love playing that Faerie trick! Tongue-Tied, it's called. Anyways, I'm here to learn you the ways of the Old country," she said.



"OldabibCountrabab?" Kathrynne asked, as red embarassment seeped into her cheeks.
"Yes, the old country. I'll come again tomorrow. By the way, I'm Lekksi," the Faerie girl said. Lekksi clapped her hands and was gone, leaving Kathrynne in the most puzzled manner.



~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*



The next day, a Saturday, Kathrynne hardly said a word. She was wondering whether the meeting with Lekksi the day before had been real, or if she had just been dreaming. She jumped at every sound, and had a. . . strange feeling when she went near her dog Cornflake. It was like Cornflake was about to attack Kathrynne, though she was sure her golden retriever would never do that.




The phone rang, and Kathrynne jumped into the air. She picked up the reciever.
"Hello?" She said.
"Hiya Kathrynne," a voice said. She smiled. Leave it to Saree to call her. It was like a Saturday ritual.
"Yep, this is Kathrynne."
"Tell me something I don't know. Anyways, guess what?"

Kathrynne could picture Saree jumping up and down, black curls bouncing in her tan face.
"What?" she said, then the line went dead. Kathrynne frowned, the hung up.



Kathrynne went outside, and climbed up the sycamore tree. The view from up there was wonderful, and it allowed her to see over the roofs of a typical suburb. When they were younger, Saree and Kathrynne pretended to be pirates on a pirate ship. But now, she could see monstrous black clouds coming in; a sure sign of a storm.



She heard a bike bell ring, and looked down. Saree was leaning against her red, battered bike. She wore a black helmet that kept slipping over her eyes.




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Thu Feb 16, 2006 11:53 pm
Keowyn says...



hey, thanks! yes i was very tired, an as soon as possibly i'm going to redo those errors.

i'm looking forward to writing this one.




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Thu Feb 16, 2006 11:18 pm
-KayJuran- wrote a review...



i noticed you've got more spacing between each paragraph with this one. great thing to do 'cause it makes it easier to read.

Keowyn wrote:stringy brown hair


^ i'd probably say string-like, just 'cause i'm not sure about stringy. i'm sure it works either way though.

Keowyn wrote:Her mother nodded vaguely, hands furiously kneading bread dough


^ i think you should say 'her hands' after the comma or just leave out the 'hands' bit altogether.

Keowyn wrote:Kathryyne stopped at the top of the stairs


^ small typo here. only one 'y' every other time you've written Kathrynne.

Keowyn wrote:"Sorry, sweetie. I gave you the wrong envelope. He handed another envelpe to Kathrynne, adn this time when she ripped it open her Elvis stamp was there. Giving her father aquick hug, she ran to her room.


^ i think you must have been tired when you did this bit. ;) you need speech marks after 'envelope' and you have a few spelling errors / typos on the 'envelpe', 'adn' and 'aquick'. easy to fix though.

Keowyn wrote:Moaning, she flopped onto her bed


^ no errors here, i was just wondering if there was a better word than 'moaning'...

oh wow, i love the ending. i most definately want to find out what happens next!! :) :P :)

please, please, please tell me if you post any more to your story. i want to read more...

keep up the good work!

~KayJuran~





"She doesn't even go here!"
— Damian Leigh