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My Magic

by YellowSweater


I grew up in the worlds of Narnia, Middle Earth, Hogwarts, and Prydain. I knew the mythologies of these imaginary universes better than those of my own reality. I thought I could fight injustice with a sword, commune with plants and animals, and perform powerful incantations. I waited patiently for an adventure to sweep me up. I never happened upon an interdimensional wardrobe, but because I looked for magic, I found it all around me. Sometimes, as I roamed through the woods, or lay in bed listening to the rain pound down, I was sharply aware of some underlying rhythm. I was aware of a tenuous mystery I could feel but never explain. As I got older, the distance between me and the fantasy worlds of my childhood grew until these vague moments were the only kind of magic I managed to hold onto. I still want to believe in magic. I think that is in part why I write. But unlike my younger self, I am inclined to filter my magical experiences through the encumbering lens of logic and language. My writing concerns itself with attempting to reconcile the unexplainable with the rational. Often I find I do this best by harnessing the power of passionate emotion.

I feel like English does a poor job accommodating the contradictions that are an inherent part of the human experience. This has driven me to pair words together in unconventional, occasionally uncomfortable ways, to appeal to the visceral rather than analytical pieces of my readers’ brains. One of my favorite poets, Federico García Lorca, does this marvelously. Though on an intellectual level I haven't managed to decode the “meaning” of his poems, they are still so vibrant. With the quiet intimacy of his imagery, he manages to invoke duende, a Spanish concept meaning something akin to passionate inspiration. I have searched for this duende in my writing, and I've found it in both the epic and the ordinary. Duende is so beautifully undefinable, unpredictable, that I have come to the conclusion that it must be magic. A magic that cannot be described, only felt.

I want my readers to feel the small moments in my stories just as much as the big ones. I long to capture that particular feeling of drinking tea in the rain or of walking through the canned goods aisle in the supermarket, as much as I want to describe a terrible battle or the night sky. Though I am still searching for Lothlorien, I have found my magic in the messy harmony of reality, and I have spent the last few years of my life trying to translate it onto the page.


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Sat Mar 27, 2021 4:41 pm
HarryHardy wrote a review...



Good Morning/Afternoon/Evening/Night(whichever one it is in your part of the world),

Hi! I'm here to leave a quick review!!

First Impression: This was a really interesting piece to read. I don't usually read too many essays on here but I think this was quite a lot of fun to read. It sounded really interesting from the description and it did not dissapoint.

Anyway let's get right to it,

I grew up in the worlds of Narnia, Middle Earth, Hogwarts, and Prydain. I knew the mythologies of these imaginary universes better than those of my own reality. I thought I could fight injustice with a sword, commune with plants and animals, and perform powerful incantations. I waited patiently for an adventure to sweep me up. I never happened upon an interdimensional wardrobe, but because I looked for magic, I found it all around me. Sometimes, as I roamed through the woods, or lay in bed listening to the rain pound down, I was sharply aware of some underlying rhythm. I was aware of a tenuous mystery I could feel but never explain. As I got older, the distance between me and the fantasy worlds of my childhood grew until these vague moments were the only kind of magic I managed to hold onto. I still want to believe in magic. I think that is in part why I write. But unlike my younger self, I am inclined to filter my magical experiences through the encumbering lens of logic and language. My writing concerns itself with attempting to reconcile the unexplainable with the rational. Often I find I do this best by harnessing the power of passionate emotion.


Well that's an very interesting opening paragraph. I really like the way its written. It definitely gets your attention and introduces you to the topic as it should but the way you talk of the magic you sense around you and how you experienced the worlds of those stories is really well done. Then the gradual fading of that through logic is also a really well written transition. Just some great language up there.

I feel like English does a poor job accommodating the contradictions that are an inherent part of the human experience. This has driven me to pair words together in unconventional, occasionally uncomfortable ways, to appeal to the visceral rather than analytical pieces of my readers’ brains. One of my favorite poets, Federico García Lorca, does this marvelously. Though on an intellectual level I haven't managed to decode the “meaning” of his poems, they are still so vibrant. With the quiet intimacy of his imagery, he manages to invoke duende, a Spanish concept meaning something akin to passionate inspiration. I have searched for this duende in my writing, and I've found it in both the epic and the ordinary. Duende is so beautifully undefinable, unpredictable, that I have come to the conclusion that it must be magic. A magic that cannot be described, only felt.


Ooooh that's some really good language there too. The words flow together really well here and it gives it a really nice sophistication without feeling like its too much. You've done a really good of bringing across your point here.

I want my readers to feel the small moments in my stories just as much as the big ones. I long to capture that particular feeling of drinking tea in the rain or of walking through the canned goods aisle in the supermarket, as much as I want to describe a terrible battle or the night sky. Though I am still searching for Lothlorien, I have found my magic in the messy harmony of reality, and I have spent the last few years of my life trying to translate it onto the page.


Aaand that's a great conclusion. It sums up the ideas from earlier really well and that last line especially has been chosen really well.

Aaaaand that's it for this one.

Overall: Overall I think this was great. Yeah that's all I've got left to say here....:D

As always remember to take what you think was helpful and forget the rest.

Stay Safe
Harry




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Sat Mar 27, 2021 3:35 pm
AlyTheBookworm says...



This reads like a journal entry, or maybe an excerpt from a memoir. I love it. It's written beautifully and the idea is something I strongly relate to as a lifelong dreamer and writer with an overactive imagination. I'm excited to read more of your work. Thanks for sharing!

Also, welcome to YWS! I hope you come to love it here as much as I do. :)




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Sat Mar 27, 2021 1:46 am
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chikara wrote a review...



Hello there!

Usually when writing essays, a writer should aim to make it as objective as possible instead of subjective to the person who wrote it. I believe there is room in some cases, mainly because of the way we are taught to write an essay in the younger grades, but as a person who is now in grad school, that wouldn't fly by my professors haha.

Speaking of essay writing rules that have room to be expanded on, the same could be applied with phrases such as "I think," "I believe," and anything that states opinion before actual factual statements because of the reasons listed above.

There are also ways to format an essay that are commonly used: introduction, which is the part where you, of course, introduce your idea. Then, body, which shows supporting reasons why you feel the way you do about the topic. Lastly, conclusion, which wraps up your statements and restates the idea once more.

Here the idea is your belief (or want of belief) in magic, but within the first paragraph, I am not introduced to what you are trying to get across with this. I can see the emotions you feel towards this, but I can't see the main point you want to state, which is arguably the most important thing when drafting up an essay.

Second paragraph introduces us to whole idea that is different to the one we begin with, and I personally think the connection between those ideas are thinly intertwined because, like I mentioned above, there isn't an exact point you're trying to make with all of this. I'm unsure if you're trying to inform a reader, or trying to persuade a reader, or something else.

I must bring up "I feel like English does a poor job accommodating the contradictions that are an inherent part of the human experience" as well; I'd like to know what is this trying to say because there isn't any background surrounding why you feel like this, or why you think someone else should maybe feel this way too.

Last paragraph wraps everything up, but it doesn't restate the idea or any kind of point you're trying to get across. (You might be seeing a similar message in every comment I have for paragraphs because that is really the only issue I see.)

I think this has some great potential ~

chi






Thank you so much! I appreciate your feedback! This is definitely more of a creative nonfiction piece than a conventional essay, so it's more telling the story of my journey as a writer than trying to make a point. But I would totally agree with your excellent points if this were an academic essay, goodness I shutter to think what my englis teacher would say if I submitted this lolol




Adventure is worthwhile.
— Aesop