Young Writers Society

Home » Literary works » Article / Essay » Politics

E - Everyone

Should the Driving age be lowered in Canada?

by Stellarjay


                                                  

Getting your Novice driver’s license is one of the biggest milestones in a teenager’s life. They are now able to drive wherever they want without having to stand for hours on end on the bus. Teenagers love being able to go places and hangout with their friends, but not being able to drive at 15 or being able to drive all their friends at 17 is very restricting. What if teenagers could get their learner’s license at 15 and get their Novice at 16? Not only would they get out more, but they would become more responsible for how much money they spend and overall become more prepared for the future.

Many people believe that teenagers are ill prepared for the future. They also believe that they’ll be unprepared for adulthood. Although that may be true in some respects, teenagers have great potential. If given the chance, they could be excellent drivers. They would also become more prepared for the future, such as learning how car insurance works and how to manage money. You may ask, won’t they learn how to do all that when they are 16, what’s the difference? Well, assuming that they will be going to college, they won’t have a good amount of time to learn and add on to their money management skills. If they get their driver's license when they are 15, they will have enough time to develop and strengthen those skills.

Though public transit is more affordable and eco friendly, it takes a long time to get anywhere. What a teenager loves best is to be able to get out of the house and spend quality time with their friends. But it’s hard to spontaneously meet up when public transit takes a long time to get where you need to go. Teenagers wouldn’t have to worry about public transit if they could drive themselves. Allowing teens to drive would let them be able to help a loved one in need. If there’s an emergency, they may have to drive out to help. Due to the driving age, they can’t do that. But if the driving age was lowered, teens wouldn’t have to feel helpless in a time of need. You may ask, couldn’t they just take public transit? Yes they could, but yet again, it would take too long. By the time they get to the location of the emergency, it might be too late. Overall, public transit is eco friendly and time consuming. Yet driving is less eco friendly and fast.

Yes, public transit is affordable and yes, a driver's license is important. But why do we have to wait so long to get our drivers license? In Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and in the Yukon you must be 14 to 15 years old to get your driver’s license. Why can’t that be the same for the rest of Canada? If we fight hard enough, you may be able to get your driver’s license at 15. A teenager’s greatest milestone is getting their driver’s license, why not allow them to get it at age 15?


Note: You are not logged in, but you can still leave a comment or review. Before it shows up, a moderator will need to approve your comment (this is only a safeguard against spambots). Leave your email if you would like to be notified when your message is approved.







Is this a review?


  

Comments



User avatar
50 Reviews


Points: 1661
Reviews: 50

Donate
Sun Feb 23, 2020 1:06 am
View Likes
PlainandSimple wrote a review...



hello!

I get exactly what you are talking about. You have a great number of facts to prove your point and get your thoughts across. From what I read I would have to agree with the fact that you guys should be able to get your driver's licenses sooner. In America, you are 14 to get your permit and must be 16 to get your driver's license. Even 16 is too high, that is because people need jobs. So if you were to edit maybe add more about how it can improve the younger people to be able to drive to a job. You did great with being persuasive too! I also like how you have a counterclaim in there about public transit.

Publis transit can be slow, disgusting, and very risky. Disgusting because they don't pick up things, and risky because there is always a chance of getting kidnapped. (Which I'm sure nobody wants that happening to there child unless they are messed up or something). Really great job with your essay! You have a great argument, and great facts to back up what you believed. I can't wait to be reading more of your work! Great job!

_From your friend,
@PlainandSimple _




Stellarjay says...


Thank you so much for your review!



User avatar
512 Reviews


Points: 18331
Reviews: 512

Donate
Fri Feb 21, 2020 10:38 pm
View Likes
Lavvie says...



The title is inaccurate as driving age is legislated provincially. From the content here, I’m assuming you’re writing in the context of British Columbia. Just wanted to clarify that for readers and also your purpose! :) You may even be able to develop some arguments making province-to-province comparisons.




Stellarjay says...


Thank you for your review!



User avatar
1237 Reviews


Points: 35932
Reviews: 1237

Donate
Fri Feb 21, 2020 2:11 pm
View Likes
niteowl wrote a review...



Hi there Stellarjay! Niteowl here to review.

Okay, so perspective here. I'm almost twice your age, started taking driver's ed at 14 years and 9 months (the youngest you can take it in my state, and yes I know it's weirdly specific), got my learner's permit at 15, but didn't take the driving test to get my full license until I was 17 due to not logging enough hours of driving with my parents. Had I taken the test at 16, I would have had a restricted license, meaning I couldn't drive after midnight (and I think there might have been restrictions about driving with other teens, but I don't remember for sure). About six weeks after I finally got my license, I rear-ended someone and totaled my car because I was driving too fast for the weather/traffic conditions. Since then, I've had a clean record, though I have had some close calls and did get pulled over once for speeding (luckily got off with a warning).

So from my perspective, I don't think this is a very persuasive argument. It doesn't have any data supporting its claims and doesn't really address any of the reasons lawmakers, insurance companies, and parents consider teen drivers a liability. In fact, I'm fairly certain the trend has been for driver's license ages to go up in recent years, not down.

What a teenager loves best is to be able to get out of the house and spend quality time with their friends. But it’s hard to spontaneously meet up when public transit takes a long time to get where you need to go.


Okay, so why exactly is this a good thing? Teenagers going god-knows-where to do god-knows-what is precisely what most parents fear about teens driving. That said, you might be able to strengthen this argument by addressing the importance of good social relationships and how driving could help those. I would get some data to support this point. If you can't find any, it's a weak argument and I would drop it.

They would also become more prepared for the future, such as learning how car insurance works and how to manage money. You may ask, won’t they learn how to do all that when they are 16, what’s the difference?


Okay, so I think you might have a better argument here with the "driving helps teens develop responsibility" angle, but I would approach it in a different way. Realistically, it's not the teen buying the car and the car insurance (which is more expensive for teen drivers due to all the liabilities), but the parents, so talking about car insurance is not terribly relevant. What might be more persuasive is talking about teens getting a part-time job and how that will build beneficial real-world skills and give them money to manage (and spend on things like clothes and entertainment so parents don't have to). There's probably some data you can use in your favor here. Anecdotally, I know my parents were annoyed enough at having to drop me off/pick me up from work that it pushed them to let me take the test and get my license (and even get me a second car after I totaled the first one). This could also tie in better with the "public transit is unreliable" angle. A kid being late to go to work is much more persuasive than a kid being late to go hang out with their friends.

Allowing teens to drive would let them be able to help a loved one in need. If there’s an emergency, they may have to drive out to help.


Obvious counterargument: "Couldn't they call 911 (or whatever the emergency number is in Canada)?" I don't know if there's any data that could help with this, but if you know of a real example where a teen driving could have been more helpful than emergency services, I would include it.

Overall, public transit is eco friendly and time consuming. Yet driving is less eco friendly and fast.


I would use "but" instead of "and" in these sentences, as you're contrasting the positives of each transport method with the negatives.

But why do we have to wait so long to get our drivers license? In Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and in the Yukon you must be 14 to 15 years old to get your driver’s license.


If I had to hazard a guess, I'd say those areas are likely more rural and don't even have public transportation alternatives, so driving younger has more advantages than disadvantages. Also, driving in rural areas is usually easier than urban areas in my experience.

Overall, my biggest suggestion is find some data and address the real arguments against teen driving. Their brains aren't fully developed, especially the prefrontal cortex that helps make responsible decisions. They're more likely to do risky things like text and drive, drink and drive, speed, etc--especially when they're with friends. They're more likely to get into accidents due to inexperience and risky behavior. I'm not saying this is true for you or all teenagers, but it's what scares parents and lawmakers into raising the driving age.

It might be worth looking into any studies that compare provinces that do allow younger drivers to those that don't, or data from before and after driver's license ages increased or decreased somewhere. If you can find anything that suggests that younger drivers are more of a benefit than a risk, that would help your argument a lot. While anecdotal evidence is weaker, it might also help your case if you can find stories of people who were put at a disadvantage by not being able to drive younger (not hypothetical examples).

To end on a positive note, I do think the essay is structured well and has solid grammar.

Keep writing and don't worry, you'll get your license and be stuck in endless traffic soon enough :P.




Stellarjay says...


Thanks for your Review! greatly appreciated!



User avatar
34 Reviews


Points: 184
Reviews: 34

Donate
Wed Feb 19, 2020 5:15 pm
View Likes
LadyMysterio says...



Hello stellar! Cool essay, i was talking to my grandpa, about driving. He said that when he gto his you only had your L for a month (when you were sixteen) and then could get your N. i would love it if it would go back down!





The human heart has hidden treasures, in secret kept, in silence sealed...
— Charlotte Bronte