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Regenerative farming

by Stellarjay


This is a script for a presentation I have to do. Any critiques on flow, content organization and grammar are welcome!

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In a technology driven world we are always looking for the most convenient and easy solution. Farmers around the world think the same way, using pesticides, tractors and tills. But in doing so they have found that their soil becomes dusty and dry. The top soil, the most important layer, blows away in the wind. This is not only affecting our food supply, but it is also affecting the climate on a major scale. But how can we stop this? There is in fact an easy solution and it is called regenerative farming.

There are two main types of regenerative farming; no-till farming and regenerative grazing. No-till farming focuses on not tilling the soil. Because when you have your tractors come through making rows for your plants, you kill a lot of important organisms like worms. The worms will dig through the soil looking for decomposing matter to eat, this helps with two things, fertilizing the plants and aerating the soil. The best part is, it’s free. Another big part of no-till is to grow many things together. So instead of having large swaths of land that you grow wheat on, year after year, instead grow wheat, peas and corn in the same field.

Regenerative grazing is the most revolutionary of the two. The common belief regarding cows is that they produce a lot of methane and take up a lot of land, contributing quite a bit to climate change. While this may be true, cows aren’t the problem, it’s the farmer. The idea here is to rotate your grazing animals around the grazing land. So you section off the land, so the animals can only eat grass in one area. They will eat the grass all the way down, do their business and trample on it. Then you move them onto the next section of land where they do the same thing. When the grazing animals get back to that same section of land, the grass will have grown to be lush and tall again. This process prevents overgrazing and desertification. It also provides more nutrients and biomass for the land, making it very healthy. In this way, desertification can be reversed in just a couple of years which is simply astounding.

The one thing these two practices have in common are creating as many relationships with the land as possible. From the plants and cows, all the way down to the soil and insects. In this way we can produce quality food while caring for our planet.

Section 2:

In the 1950’s, Allan Savory was a young biologist in Africa. He was helping set aside land for national parks. They removed the peoples and hunters who occupied the land. In the following years the land began to deteriorate. The only reason for this, Savory thought, was that the land wasn’t able to sustain the large number of animals. So he proposed to the government that they needed to reduce their numbers. The government agreed, so in the following year over 40,000 elephants were shot. It was too late when Savory realized what a mistake he had made. The land never bounced back like they thought. So Savory was determined to find solutions. After years of research he found that to have healthy land, you have to mimic nature. In this way, Savory educated farmers and brought back grasslands. As you can see in these photos, in just a couple of years, these deteriorating grasslands have been brought back to what they are supposed to be, lush, green and alive with animals.

But how does regenerative farming benefit the farmers? While it may be labor intensive in the beginning, it’s incredibly easy to adopt. All you need is some patience and knowledge of how your land works. Once you get your land established, (especially with grasslands) it becomes self sufficient. Costs of feed for grazing animals goes down because the grasslands provide an abundant amount of food for them. Maintenance costs are almost eliminated because you don’t have tilling equipment to constantly check on and fix. It not only increases crop yield but it also produces quality food. Regenerative farming is also beneficial to the planet as a whole. It reduces carbon emissions which are safely stored in the soil and it also helps the land soak up rainwater. This is why we need to go back down to the bare basics and mimic what nature has been doing all along.


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Sat May 29, 2021 4:00 pm
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Liminality wrote a review...



Hi Stellarjay! Thanks for an interesting and informative read. The overall impression I had of your script was that the key points are clearly made. For a spoken PowerPoint presentation, this would work nicely to make your point to the reader. It’s memorable and the technical details are explained in a simple, accessible way.

Language

I thought the word choices were very suitable for a text of this type. Even though you used technical terminology, I thought each term was explained in a clear, concise way. In the introduction, I got the sense that things were a bit wordier than elsewhere in the text, maybe because it was to outline the topic. I tend to get pretty mechanical when outlining things too! Wordy introductions might be a bit difficult to read or speak aloud, which I’m assuming is what this is meant for, since you mentioned it’s a presentation, so it might be good to cut out some additional words, for example in “There is in fact . . . “ you could probably do without “in fact”.

Another suggestion I’d make would be to use more sign post words like “Because of this, . . .” or “Therefore . . . “. For instance, it wasn’t immediately evident to me how the cows were relevant in the third paragraph, because they were introduced in a direct statement without a linking word that connected it to the previous sentence. It would make sense in spontaneous conversation, since when you’re speaking spontaneously, you can’t always predict what topic is coming up next, but since you’ve had the opportunity to script this, I think you could rearrange it in a way that helps you get your points across more clearly. Here’s one way you might do that:

1) Regenerative grazing is the most revolutionary of the two.
2) The idea here is to rotate your grazing animals around the grazing land.
3) Although cows produce a lot of methane and take up a lot of land, the role of the farmer’s technique in raising them plays a larger role.


Structure

I thought the structure in the second paragraph especially flowed very naturally. Not only was the explanation clear, you broke up the longer sentences with shorter ones at just the right point. I would also suggest either a paragraph break or a longer pause (if you’re reading it out) at
Regenerative farming is also beneficial to the planet as a whole

This is because the previous parts of the paragraph are about benefits to farmers specifically.

Finally, one thing that made this text so effective was how you repeated the same idea of “mimicking nature” at strategic points in the argument. It felt natural, not like a formulaic essay that might repeat a point in the final sentence of each paragraph. The idea was interspersed wherever it came up logically and I thought that made the text more persuasive.

That’s all

Hope some of this is helpful – and keep writing!
- Lim




Stellarjay says...


Thanks so much for the review! It helped a lot <3



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Tue May 25, 2021 11:44 am
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MailicedeNamedy wrote a review...



Hi Stellarjay,

Mailice here with a short review! :D

I'm going to try my best to examine your presentation a little bit and find some weak points. The first time I read it, I thought it was quite solid and I liked the structure you present.

In a technology driven world we are always looking for the most convenient and easy solution. Farmers around the world think the same way, using pesticides, tractors and tills. But in doing so they have found that their soil becomes dusty and dry. The top soil, the most important layer, blows away in the wind. This is not only affecting our food supply, but it is also affecting the climate on a major scale. But how can we stop this? There is in fact an easy solution and it is called regenerative farming.


Your introduction is very good, showing modern problems and making the audience aware of your presentation. It also gives the audience the opportunity to think about what regenerative farming is.
I don't know how this is regulated in your case and how the presentation depends on the length and interactivity of the audience. I'll just paste this in because I think it might be helpful: You ended with the title of your presentation in the first paragraph and then jump straight to what the two types are. I would put in a definition that someone has given of what exactly regenerative farming is before you go on and explain it in your own words.

no-till farming and regenerative grazing. No-till farming focuses on not tilling the soil.


I don't have your presentation in front of me, but I would insert something like: "We will now look at the two main types one after the other, starting with no-till farming.

Because when you have your tractors come through making rows for your plants, you kill a lot of important organisms like worms.


I would take the "because" out of the front and maybe ask some kind of question to the audience, because farming is actually about till and it could be a bit hard to understand for some people.

fertilizing the plants and aerating the soil.


Since you say just before that that it helps with two things, I would add a firstly and secondly.

The best part is, it's free.


Here again; I don't see your slides, so I don't know if there's a pause between the last sentence and here. I would somehow add a transition to this sentence, otherwise this point could also be taken as the "third point" from before.

Regenerative grazing is the most revolutionary of the two.


I would create a better transition here. "Now that we have seen what no-till farming is, let's move on to the second main type." Or something.

The idea here is to rotate your grazing animals around the grazing land. So you section off the land, so the animals can only eat grass in one area. They will eat the grass all the way down, do their business and trample on it. Then you move them onto the next section of land where they do the same thing.


It would be best to add here how often such a rotation should be done, or whether it is annual or not.

The one thing these two practices have in common are creating as many relationships with the land as possible. From the plants and cows, all the way down to the soil and insects. In this way we can produce quality food while caring for our planet.


You create a good summary here for the main types just presented. But I would expand the last sentence a bit more for the conclusion.

In the 1950's, Allan Savory was a young biologist in Africa. He was helping set aside land for national parks. They removed the peoples and hunters who occupied the land. In the following years the land began to deteriorate.


I would try to put the sentences together a little more fluidly here, as they seem a little blunt at this short and simple length.

In general, I thought the performance was very good. You describe everything carefully and go into detail well on some things, and come up with smaller examples. You also create a good way of making the listener aware of the consequences of not understanding how nature works with your "storytelling" in the second section. As an audience member, I think following the presentation is very easy. You already show a good structure here.

It is difficult to judge what you are allowed to say during the presentation (involving the audience; asking open questions; asking if they know examples themselves, or if they know someone who is already doing regenerative farming) or if you are also allowed to give more examples, or how much time you have. However, I would say that you have given a good overview with this text, and that you have covered the most important points. I think this will create a conscience in the listener and also the possible curiosity to read deeper into this topic.

Good luck with your presentation!

Mailice.




Stellarjay says...


Thanks so much for the review! <3




To answer before listening—that is folly and shame.
— Proverbs 18:13