Young Writers Society

Home » Literary works » Article / Essay » General


Code Switching Essay

by AmyH


One of the most common reasons for code switching is trying to speak like others, in most schools this means speaking properly. Most people, including kids, have different dialects when speaking English or any other language. These different dialects are seen as improper to speak at professions and in schools. Most people do not speak to their parents the same way that they speak to their friends because of the concept that there is a place and time for everything. Schools have a similar unwritten rules. Schools require students to code switch in order to speak in a professional manor.

Code switching can happen unconsciously, but, when in school it is done consciously to show respect by speaking properly. An article on code switching states that it is done for many reasons one of the most popular being, “We want to fit in: Very often, people code-switch — both consciously and unconsciously — to act or talk more like those around them.”(Five Reasons Why People Code-Switch)One of the main reasons for code switching is to try to fit in, although in school it occurs mostly because of professionalism, fitting in is a large factor as well. Having an accent or a different way of speaking a certain language is sometimes seen as an unsuitable way of speaking. In order to speak ‘suitably’ people code switch to seem more like others, fit in. Fitting in is an important reason for code switching at school but so is the idea, that schools imply but never explicitly say, of having a time to speak relaxed and a time to speak properly and act professionally.

The way people speak is dependent on the occasion and the location, for example, in schools speaking ‘correctly’ is of importance. This article states that there are times when people need to use dialect and times when they need to talk differently, code switch. “And in that beautiful line of thinking, one could argue that there’s a time to talk in dialect and a time to talk like you’re in mixed company.” (The Whens and Wheres of Code Switching and “Talking Black”) The writer believes that there are certain times when society favors people who speak ‘standard english’ and times when speaking ‘slang’ is fine. In school students who speak ‘properly’ seem to be more correct than those who speak English differently or informally. A person should not have to change the way they talk at school solely because it is ‘socially correct. Others might argue that, a person would not use the same vocabulary they use to talk to a teacher to talk to a younger child. Though this opinion is valid, it does not justify weather speaking ‘proper’ should be as important as it is. In schools code switching occurs to appeal to the general idea that proper is better.



Code switching has many positive and negative views depending on the point of view that a person looks at it. Code switching in schools from English to ‘better’ English is useful in a world where proper is seen as better, but in a way does not stay true to who you are. A person should not have to depart from how they are to a person who they should be, but in order to be accepted and respected it is necessary. Code switching in schools most commonly occurs to fit in and be accepted by society, the people who surround you. Code switching in schools transpires because what society defines as proper.


Note: You are not logged in, but you can still leave a comment or review. Before it shows up, a moderator will need to approve your comment (this is only a safeguard against spambots). Leave your email if you would like to be notified when your message is approved.







Is this a review?


  

Comments



User avatar
1220 Reviews


Points: 72525
Reviews: 1220

Donate
Thu Jan 28, 2016 7:57 pm
Kale wrote a review...



Hello Amy. Since this looks like a school assignment, I'll be reviewing this as thoroughly as possible. Let me know if you have any questions about anything I mention.

Overall, this looks like the start of a persuasive essay arguing against code switching in schools. Your general structure is okay, though you could definitely improve the execution, particularly of the introduction.

Introductions have two main purposes: to introduce what you are writing about and why you are writing about it. Right now, the biggest issue with your introduction is that you haven't explained with code switching is, even though you've provided a lot of examples and context for it.

I would recommend starting your essay with the definition of code switching before you get into the examples or explanations (since those are part of the development/body). Starting out with "Code switching is ___." and then talking about the different dialects people have would help your readers understand your topic a lot more easily.

You do an okay job with introducing why you're writing about code switching by focusing on the difference between casual and professional communication, so you don't need to change much in the first paragraph.

I recommend moving the first sentence of your first paragraph to be the first sentence of your second paragraph. The ideas flow a lot better that way, especially after you develop the introduction a bit more.

I would also recommend introducing the controversy about code switching in schools a bit earlier, right before or at the same time as you cite the quote from the article. A lead-in like "However, not everyone thinks that code switching is a good thing." would help transition between the facts and the opinions. Right now, all the opinions are lumped together at the end (which isn't a bad thing) in their own section separate from the rest of the essay (which is generally not a good thing unless that was the format required for the assignment).

Now for some specific areas of improvement:

You have a lot of repetition in this, and while repeating ideas can help reinforce them and make them stronger, repeating things right after (and in the same sentence in some cases) does the exact opposite. A lot of examples of this can be found in your second paragraph, such as in this sentence: "One of the main reasons for code switching is to try to fit in, although in school it occurs mostly because of professionalism, fitting in is a large factor as well." I would recommend restructuring this sentence to something more like "Although code switching in school occurs mostly because of professionalism, fitting in is a large factor as well." It is a lot less redundant and easier to read.

Your citations need a lot of work, not just in how you incorporate the quotes into your writing, but also in how you cite the source itself. I'm not sure if you've been taught how to use a citation format like MLA or if you were told to use the format you did, but typically, when citing sources online, the link is included after the quote or paraphrase in parentheses as (Source) and a list of all the sources is provided at the end of the piece. To give you an example:

“And in that beautiful line of thinking, one could argue that there’s a time to talk in dialect and a time to talk like you’re in mixed company.” (Source)

[rest of the essay]

Sources Cited

"The Whens and Wheres of Code Switching and 'Talking Black'" by Janelle Harris (2013)

If you're going to be giving a hard copy out, having a list of the sources you used at the end of the piece is even more important, and instead of using "Source", you can use either the author's name (preferred) or a shortened version of the full title (ex. "The Whens and Wheres...").

In any case, you're missing a link to the "Five Reasons Why People Code-Switch" article.

You also have a number of grammatical errors throughout this such as run-on sentences (the first sentence is an example), missing punctuation (especially after parentheses), and missing words (such as in the last sentence). Once you take care of the larger structural issues (reorganizing the introduction and introducing your opinion earlier), I would recommend reading this out loud to yourself. Doing so will help you notice a lot of errors you would otherwise miss by reading silently.

And again, if you have any questions about anything I mentioned, please let me know.




User avatar
23 Reviews


Points: 52
Reviews: 23

Donate
Thu Jan 28, 2016 3:49 am
gema11 wrote a review...



First of all, you should explain what code switching is early on in your essay. You do not need to explain it in the introduction, but include it in the first paragraph.
Secondly, watch your grammar. I see a lot of run-on sentences and misuse of commas. Look up on the rules of using colons and semicolons, or break up sentences. Using them will improve the flow of your essay.
Ex.: "The way people speak is dependent on the occasion and the location, for example, in schools speaking ‘correctly’ is of importance." This should be "The way people speak is dependent on the occasion and the location. For example, speaking ‘correctly’ in is important."
A tip that goes along with this example- make sure that you do not overly complicate your sentences! Sometimes your verbs, subjects, etc., etc., are arranged in ways that are not strictly incorrect, but still confusing.
Some other things:
-"professional manor" should be "professional manner"
-Vary your sentence lengths. They seem to be all long, complex (if not run-on) sentences. Include some short, simple sentences in a natural way to break the monotony of continuously complex sentences.





uwu
— soundofmind