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[Retired] Storybook Section Handbook



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Storybook Section Handbook

Brought to you by your friendly neighborhood pirates.


The Storybook Rules & Resources thread is a great introduction to the world of storybooking, but you might have a few questions that weren't answered by it. This thread is where you can find those answers. We've compiled a list of some common questions and their answers, but don't be afraid to ask more in this thread!

But, before you do ask your questions, check out the Rules & Resources thread and the posts in this one - chances are your question has been asked before!

What are the differences between storybooks, roleplays and DTWH threads?

Storybooks are large, collaborative writing projects. Group size can vary, but there's almost always more than four people involved. The story is told through long posts that alternate between characters. It's common practice to collaborate with people on your posts if their characters play a major role in your post, but it's also just as common to work on posts on your own. Essentially, it's like writing a novel with a group of co-authors.

Roleplays are also large, collaborative writing projects, but they're not as structured. Posts also alternate between characters and tend to be shorter than storybook posts. They can have less planning than storybooks do, but also have the potential to have extensive planning. While storybooks are the realm of original characters, characters in roleplayers typically come from previously made stories.

DTWH (Double-Trouble Writing Huddle) threads are like roleplays on a smaller scale. As the name suggests, they're between two people. The posts tend to be on the smaller side, but they're the same as roleplaying when it comes to varying post lengths. When it comes to writing for other people's characters, the rules vary depending on the writers involved. Some posts may focus specifically on the actions of a single person's character(s), while others may be collaborated on by both people.
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Section Guide: Storybooks


Image


How often do I have to post in a SB?

It really depends on the storybook. Some storybooks might have a requirement - i.e. one post per month - but most of them involve a posting schedule. Depending on everyone else's schedules and speed when it comes to posting, you might be writing a post every month or every few months.

How do you get people interested in joining a SB?

Posting about it on your wall is always a good start. I suggest putting the intro post on your wall, or doing a short little blurb on the plot - it gives people an idea of what your storybook is about.

You can also mention it over in Requests: Storybook Edition thread in the Storybook Club.

How do I tell who is allowed to join a SB?

Reading through the actual storybook's description and the posts in the discussion thread (DT) usually will let you know what someone is looking for. Most storybooks tend to have a limited number of spaces, so you can always check the list of writers to see if any are left. And, if you ever have any questions on if there's a spot available, you can check with the person running the storybook!

How do I keep action rolling in SBs?

The simple answer is to talk with the other writers. Storybooks with active DTs tend to be active themselves - it reminds people that the story needs to progress, and can also provide the perfect brainstorming place for future plot points.

How detailed/not detailed should posts be?

Like with figuring out if you can join a storybook, you can discover how much detail a storybook's owner is looking for by checking out the SB and DT. Asking them also doesn't hurt. If they have no preference for length or amount of detail, it's really up to you. A good baseline is writing 500 word posts, but there have been writers who have done more than 2,000 in the past.

What are general rules about writing/controlling other people's characters?

As mentioned in the basic description of SBs, you're allowed to do as much as "controlling" of other characters as you want. When someone joins a storybook and makes a character, the unspoken agreement is that they'll show up in other posts. If your portrayal of that character is ever off, the character's creator can let you know what you need to change. A good piece of advice for writing other people's characters is to check out their character profile's personality section. This might give you ideas on how they would react to certain situations.

I got tagged to do a "storybook challenge". What does that mean?

Storybook Badges & Challenges goes into a lot more depth about what storybook challenges are and how they work, but they're essentially a chance for you to get badges by fulfilling different criteria. Some challenges are specific to storybooks, while others are monthly challenges brought to you courtesy of the Storybook Crew.
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Fri Apr 19, 2019 3:23 pm
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Magebird says...



Section Guide: Roleplays

[To Be Added]
Send review requests to The Crow's Nest!

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User avatar
544 Reviews

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Gender: Female
Points: 1455
Reviews: 544
Fri Apr 19, 2019 3:23 pm
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Magebird says...



Section Guide: DTWH Threads

[To Be Added]
Send review requests to The Crow's Nest!

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