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Gender Inequality in Film Survey



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Tue Sep 30, 2014 7:10 pm
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Zolen says...



Are you a boy or a girl?

euhhhhhhhhhh I have a amazing picture to reply to this with but pokeballs are involved so I can't. :C

I am male in body and mind.


How old are you?

22

What is your favorite movie? (And if you can’t decide: top 5?)

1.) How I learned to love the bomb (doctor stangelove)
2.) Hitchhikers guide to the Galaxy
3.) Monty Python and the Holy Grail
4.) The General (if your not sure what I mean look for something made in 1926)
5.) Austin Powers

Are there 2 or more female characters?

Do they talk to each other?

Do they talk about something other then a man?

Is the main character a female?

Skip all of that and I can just say as they were old setups back when the only female was the love interest or they were generic background characters, they all fail the test. Only modernish one is HHGTTG, but the is only one main female role, who is not nearly as important as she is in the books.



If you’re a girl: Do you see more films with an empowered female character or an empowered male character?

Why?

Image


Anything else you’d like to add about gender inequality in film?

The problem has to do with Hollywood and the chances given. Look where most of the female actors are ending up. Chick flicks, shows where the main point is emotion, the struggles of women. While men tend to be sticking around just about everywhere including the block busters. Women seem to not be given much chance out of those stereotypical roles, and when they do its the super badass lady. If we ever wanted to improve the situation we would need more gender neutral roles. Not just in movies, but in culture itself. Because of how people keep seeing it and complaining, its either going over the top one way or the other.
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Tue Sep 30, 2014 7:51 pm
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Sylar says...



Thank you everyone for the wonderfully detailed replies!

@Audy and @Skydreamer , my paper relies greatly on women and their interpretations on gender inequality in film, especially what they go to see in a theater. That part is focused on women and women only, because I don't know very many boys that go to all the girly movies I do. I want to hear about what women think and what women go to see. Most of my friends who are guys dn't want to go to the cinema and watch a marathon of "The Fault in Our Stars," "If I Stay," "Frozen," and "Divergent", because these films are made for girls, usually by girls, with "girl empowered" themes. If you're not like that? Fine. But this is what I want to focus my report on.
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Tue Sep 30, 2014 8:08 pm
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Audy says...



Skydreamer wrote:I agree with Audy on this point. I'd suggest you allow this to be for both men and women to answer. I mean men can clearly see it as well.


Sylar wrote:Thank you everyone for the wonderfully detailed replies!

@Audy and @Skydreamer , my paper relies greatly on women and their interpretations on gender inequality in film, especially what they go to see in a theater. That part is focused on women and women only, because I don't know very many boys that go to all the girly movies I do. I want to hear about what women think and what women go to see. Most of my friends who are guys dn't want to go to the cinema and watch a marathon of "The Fault in Our Stars," "If I Stay," "Frozen," and "Divergent", because these films are made for girls, usually by girls, with "girl empowered" themes. If you're not like that? Fine. But this is what I want to focus my report on.


I think you guys mean @Aley ;)
  





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Tue Sep 30, 2014 8:25 pm
Baesch says...



Hi! So, first off, great theme. Film is one of the most formative arms of the media, so gender stereotypes it propagates do a lot of damage / have a huge influence.

Are you a boy or a girl?

I'm a girl. I mean, I could say stuff about gender identity, but I have all the female bits.

How old are you?

Nineteen.

What is your favorite movie? (And if you can’t decide: top 5?)

Probably The Dead Poet's Society (1). Oh, and Crash (2). Monty Python (3) are very funny. 12 Years a Slave (4)? Should find a fifth.. I'm not much of a film dude. Maybe The Perks of being a Wallflower (5 -- last one I watched)

Are there 2 or more female characters?

There are female characters, but in all but Crash and The Perks they have very minor roles. It strikes me that women are treated as minorities in so many films - as though we didn't address a major demographic. We're comic relief through stereotyping (Monty Python) or something for a male to react to. And where we're targeted it's terrible chick flicks, mostly. Or no? Am I just not educated in this respect?

Do they talk to each other?

In Crash no one much talks to each other.. but then again, the women, as far as I can remember, are always around their mates, talking to them. So I guess no. The Perks is far better, as the friend group is constantly chatting. The girl's role is mainly in her romantic entanglement with the main character, though.

Do they talk about something other then (THAN. sry) a man?

Um.. no? Not in major proportions, though there are definitely aspects which don't only deal with guys.

Is the main character a female?

Noop.

If you’re a girl: Do you see more films with an empowered female character or an empowered male character?

Empowered male.

Why?

How many films have you seen starring emowered female characters!? There will be a handful out there, but they're not the mainstream - and I'm not a film fanatic. I exist strictly in the mainstream.

Anything else you’d like to add about gender inequality in film?

It greatly reflects the market the enterprise thinks its modelling by. Gender inequality in film is greatly harmful. As more and more people use film as their main "imagination machine" - how should one stop this worldview being ingrained in generation after generation?

Oh, and that there's definitely a market. Like, Gravity? Not the most amazing film imo, but I was so emotionally engaged, simply because I could relate to the character. That kind of a positioning awakens windows in heads: "I could do that".
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Tue Sep 30, 2014 10:34 pm
Aley says...



@Sylar

Thanks for clearing that up. It is interesting to me that you see a strong connection personally between what men and women would go to see.

I was kind of confused on your questions what sort of information you were looking for. For instance, "Do they talk about something other then a man?" This question is sort of vague about whether you're talking about them talking to each other or their discussions in general. A lot of people were taking "they" as two female characters speaking to each other due to the last question, but in a survey, it should be clear and I took in both ways, what do the female characters talk about, and what do the female characters talk about among themselves.

With "If you’re a girl: Do you see more films with an empowered female character or an empowered male character?" the complication comes up with "empowered female character" potentially meaning a bunch of different things, and what character are we speaking about? Are we limiting it down to just main characters or are we talking about All characters? If we're talking about All characters, than even a minor character, such as the old woman who is married to the Miracle Maker can be considered an empowered character. She's a very strong woman who has strong attitude. If we limit it just down to main female characters, then again, in that movie, Buttercup is very limited, but at the same time, more empowered than her society would expect since she actually speaks out for herself.

It's a touchy question. I answered it according to all female characters in the movies regardless of if they're main characters or not.

Thanks @Audy <3
  





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Tue Sep 30, 2014 10:41 pm
Sylar says...



@Audy oh god sorry!
A SURPRISE PARTY

FOR ME

YOU SHOULDN'T HAVE

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Wed Oct 01, 2014 3:00 am
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fortis says...



Are you a boy or a girl?
I'm female
How old are you?
16
What is your favorite movie? (And if you can’t decide: top 5?)
How to Train Your Dragon
Harry Potter
UP
Are there 2 or more female characters?
yes
yes
no
Do they talk to each other?
yes
yes
N/A
Do they talk about something other then a man?
yes?
yes?
N/A
Is the main character a female?
one of them
one of them
no

If you’re a girl: Do you see more films with an empowered female character or an empowered male character?
Uhhh. yes?
That's not an answer but to be honest, I don't see many films. I think they mostly have leading male parts though. (The first films that come to mind when I'm thinking of any films that I've seen semi-recently are Chronicle (males), The secret life of walter mitty (males), a town called panic (males), the odd life of timothy green (males), frozen (females), Mulan (both males and females).)

Why?
Why....(?) do I see more films with males in them? Are you asking why I'm ending up seeing these movies, or why I go to see them specifically for gender?
Well, for the first, I think because male roles have been the tradition. Current writers find it easier to write for male leading roles because most of the movies they saw (in the past) had male roles, so they acted as a model. Also, the most advertised movies have really smart teams working behind the scenes. They don't generally want to take risks (such as having a female main role), I think.
For the second one, I don't go out to see a movie based on the genders of the main role. I just don't find that it matters.

Anything else you’d like to add about gender inequality in film?
On the part about it mattering, I think that all movies (exactly like all art) is a message to the viewer, an argument. This argument involves putting yourself in the main character's shoes. That is why they're the main character-- they're relatable, and the audience cheers for them because the audience sees themselves in the MC.
Females have been putting themselves in males shoes much longer than males have been putting themselves in female shoes. Think for a minute: it's okay for girls to like boyish toys, but its not okay for them to like girly toys (the same is true with names. Many male names have evolved into female names, but not many female names have become common male names.). Thus, women (probably) feel more comfortable relating to a male protagonist than a male feels relating to a female one.
Also, generally women are portrayed as these things that always talk about boys and makeup and looks and etc etc. Which, sometimes we do. But not all the time! I think Hollywood is still trying to breakthrough stereotypes and cliches that they think the audience needs (they're wrong) to understand that "this is a woman we're dealing with here."

And I have no clue what I just wrote, but I don't want to go back through it.
Instead, he said, Brother! I know your hunger.
To this, the Wolf answered, Lo!

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Wed Oct 01, 2014 6:15 am
Skydreamer says...



@Audy
I think you guys mean @Aley ;)


I'm sorry Aley! I mentally mix you two up sometimes and it just came out D: I totally agree with you! I'm sorry, I know who you two are! Just a mental slip-up. xP

And alright, @Sylar I understand. I just felt like men who have watched movies, including female characters could also answer the question fairly. I think too often men are left out of such questions, when really they should be the ones involved. But that's my opinion. And great job on the survey!
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Wed Oct 01, 2014 5:50 pm
BluesClues says...



In a spoiler, due to length (sorry).

Spoiler! :
Are you a boy or a girl?

I am a female person.

How old are you?

23.

What is your favorite movie? (And if you can’t decide: top 5?)

1. Julie & Julia
2. Rent
3. Cloud Atlas
4. The Road to El Dorado
5. Tarzan

Hard to get down to five favorite movies, especially as my favorite frequently shifts, but for now I'll go with these.

Are there 2 or more female characters?

1. Yes, most of the characters are female.
2. Yes
3. Yes
4. No, although the only female in the movie is pretty darn awesome.
5. Yes, but only one is human. She is a lot more bamf than people give her credit for, though. She is leading an expedition to study gorillas in a time when women were supposed to know dancing, drawing, and needlework. That's pretty darn awesome.

Do they talk to each other?

1. Yes, quite a lot.
2. Ditto
3. To my memory, no, but they live in different eras.
4. N/A
5. Yes, but in gorilla-language and meaningful looks, and only once or twice.

Do they talk about something other then a man?

1. Yes
2. Yes
3. N/A
4. N/A
5. Er...I do not speak gorilla. Let's say no.

Is the main character a female?

1. Both the main characters are female.
2. It's an ensemble cast, so the whole group, both male and female, are main characters.
3. MCs shift as the movie switches to different eras--females are the MCs in two eras of six.
4. No
5. No

If you’re a girl: Do you see more films with an empowered female character or an empowered male character? Why?

I suppose in part it depends on what you mean by "empowered"--for one thing, a character who is empowered right from the beginning, or a character who becomes empowered by the end of the movie? Main characters tend to follow the second trend, while secondary characters are more likely to be empowered from their introduction. And then it depends on whether or not you think a woman, specifically, can be empowered while also being a wife or mother. I'm of the opinion she can--probably drawing from the experience of my own mother, who has three children and a husband of twenty-five years, went to law school in her forties, and is now working as a lawyer at a nonprofit in Virginia and isn't afraid to go out and kick butt to do the things that need to be done.

So my definition of empowered is probably looser than some (i.e. those who think women can only be empowered by taking on traditionally masculine roles such as CEOs), but even so I would still say that empowered men dominate the field. And empowered white female characters are more prevalent than women of color--in Julie & Julia, there is exactly one speaking woman of color, who is a more minor role than most of the women in the movie. So from one perspective, you could say that this movie is a good, empowering movie...but once you think about women of color, it fails on that level. Rent is better on that, even though there are fewer female characters.

Of course, Julie & Julia is based on a true story, but all the same.

(I mean, I understand you were just asking about gender, but you can't really talk about gender equality/inequality without counting the extra inequality added by being a person of color.)

Anything else you’d like to add about gender inequality in film?

Trans* and nonbinary genders are almost entirely ignored. Rent includes a trans*man, but most movies leave genders other than male and female completely out.


So, that was long.
  





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Wed Oct 01, 2014 10:56 pm
Astronaut says...



@Strangelove
Strangelove wrote:Are you a boy or a girl?
Male
How old are you?
Catorce

What is your favorite movie? (And if you can’t decide: top 5?)
1. Her
2. Being John Malkovich
3. Fargo
4. A Clockwork Orange
5. Heathers
Do they talk about something other than a man?
1. Yes
2. Yes
3. No
4. No
5. Lolno


I've only seen a few minutes of Heathers, but don't they talk about, like, croquet right at the beginning?
Last edited by Astronaut on Wed Oct 01, 2014 11:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Wed Oct 01, 2014 10:58 pm
Astronaut says...



Sylar wrote:Thank you everyone for the wonderfully detailed replies!

@Audy and @Skydreamer , my paper relies greatly on women and their interpretations on gender inequality in film, especially what they go to see in a theater. That part is focused on women and women only, because I don't know very many boys that go to all the girly movies I do. I want to hear about what women think and what women go to see. Most of my friends who are guys dn't want to go to the cinema and watch a marathon of "The Fault in Our Stars," "If I Stay," "Frozen," and "Divergent", because these films are made for girls, usually by girls, with "girl empowered" themes. If you're not like that? Fine. But this is what I want to focus my report on.


Knowing our guy friends I have to disagree. They would totally do that.
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Fri Oct 03, 2014 3:31 am
Willard says...



@Astronaut Yes, they do talk about croquet. Then (spoiler alert) they go killing people, her and her badbutt boyfriend

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Fri Oct 03, 2014 3:54 am
Astronaut says...



@Stangelove you said the female characters didn't talk to each other about something other than a man when you answered... I'm confused.
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Fri Oct 03, 2014 3:57 am
Willard says...



Oh, they did. @Astronaut , I may have put something wrong

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Fri Oct 03, 2014 5:10 am
Spotswood says...



Sylar wrote:Thank you everyone for the wonderfully detailed replies!
"The Fault in Our Stars," "If I Stay," "Frozen," and "Divergent", because these films are made for girls, usually by girls, with "girl empowered" themes. If you're not like that? Fine. But this is what I want to focus my report on.


No, Frozen was not made for girls. Frozen is, in fact, about mental health and the stigma that exists in our society. Elsa clearly represents one with manic depression (let's face it, she was clearly depicted as such in the movie). At least, that is how it spoke to me at the time.

I loved that movie. It really lifted my spirits since I was in a very negative place at the time.
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