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Correct me if I'm wrong. . .



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Fri May 15, 2009 5:43 pm
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GoldenQuill says...



I know what an is used for, thank you very much.
'An' is instead of 'a'; you use it before words that start with a vowel.
But...
I've seen it used before abbreviations. Like, for an example;
'I got an SAT test to write on.'
or
'Have you had an MRI before?'
Those are just a few examples, though.
So, do you put 'an' in front of an abbreviation, or do you just follow the rule you follow with everything else?
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Fri May 15, 2009 6:31 pm
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LowKey says...



Not sure about the SAT, but with MRI, it you were to spell it how is sounds, it'd be emm-are-iy.

An emm-are-iy.

It starts off with a vowel sounds, so you treat it as though you write a vowel at the beginning of it.

Yes? :)
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Tue May 19, 2009 3:49 pm
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Mars says...



(Same with the SAT: ess ay tee. Try saying 'a ess.' :D)
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Sat Aug 15, 2009 5:33 pm
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Shenko says...



I don't think that "an SAT" is the common usage thought...generally it's pronounced "sat" so I think "a SAT" would be more appropriate.

I've always just gone by how you say it, and if it's a vowel sound at the start, use "an", otherwise use "a" as for normal words.
  








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