Young Writers Society

Home » Forums » Community » Squills - The YWS News

Squills 3/4/19 - 3/10/19



User avatar



Gender: None specified
Points: 300
Reviews: 0
Tue Mar 05, 2019 5:03 am
View Likes
SquillsBot says...



Image
Welcome to Squills, the official news bulletin of the Young Writers Society!
What will you find here? Tons of interesting news about YWS, including but not limited to: articles about writing, art, and the world of humanities; interviews with YWS members; shameless plugs; link round-ups; and opinionated columns.
And where will all of this come from? Take a look at our fantastic creative staff!

CREATIVE STAFF

Spoiler! :


Editor-in-Chief
Aley

General Editors
EternalRain
fraey

Friendly Neighborhood Robot
SquillsBot

Literary Reporter
LadyBird

Community Reporter
TheWeirdoFromBeyond
neptune

New BloodHound
ShadowVyper

Poetry Enchantress
Aley
alliyah

Resources Reporter
BiscuitsLeGuin

Storybooks Status Reporter
fraey

Writer's World Columnist
elysian

Anime Maniac
Kanome

Social Correspondent
EternalRain

Code Master
Available - PM Squillsbot if interested

General Reporters
Clarity
CloudKid

Ghost Reporter
shaniac



Of course, our content can’t come only from our staff. We also depend on you to help keep Squills successful. You’re all a part of a writing community, after all. If you’re interested in submitting to Squills, pop on over to the Reader’s Corner to find out how you can get involved by contributing an article or participating in other Squills activities.

You can apply to become a Squillian Journalist by submitting a sample article to Squillsbot today!

Well, that’s all I have for now. So, what are you waiting for? Enjoy!





User avatar



Gender: None specified
Points: 300
Reviews: 0




User avatar



Gender: None specified
Points: 300
Reviews: 0
Tue Mar 05, 2019 5:05 am
View Likes
SquillsBot says...



FEATURED MEMBER INTERVIEW WITH FANTASCIFI66
Image
written by fraey < PM: >

Hello Squills readers! I was able to sit down with the ever-awesome @Fantascifi66 and ask her a few questions about how FM life has been.

Squills: Hi! Thank you so much for taking the time to answer a few questions for Squills!

First off, happy belated congratulations for earning Featured Member! How did you feel when you first heard the news?

Fantascifi66: Thank you! Well, first I thought it was a joke. I checked multiple times to see if it was April fools Day, and speculating on how they managed to make it seem like my friends had sent me those messages. It only sunk in two days later when it actually said on the front page that I was FM, and then I sent lots of messages to my bestie with all caps. She must have been a little bit annoyed, but she congratulated me anyway. I was really, really happy. I didn't think I'd get it so soon, I thought I'd get it in three years or something. So I danced a victory dance in like four seconds, and then went back to writing. It was a good day.

S: That's a very sweet reaction! Do you have any clues as to why you earned FM?

F: I welcomed every new member under that time, and I was participating in all kinds of things. I still do, but I've taken a break from welcoming new members recently because of an essay on Wales I've been working on, but I'll start again as soon as I'm done.

S: Very understandable on that note. Is welcoming new members one of your favorite things to do on YWS? Or is there something else that you truly love to be able to do?

F: Yes, I really like welcoming people, though it's most fun when they answer! But I also really like roleplaying, it's really fun! I get to react the way I wish to because I can think about my reaction as long as I want. Well, at least until someone else posts something. Right now, I'm in a Harry Potter roleplay (two actually), an assasin school roleplay, and many, many more. My favorite character is Lee Ymsy from the Harry Potter RP, because she's so weird.


S: Do you have any advice for new members? Anything you really want to let the YWS folk know?

F: Be nice to others, have fun, and most importantly, there's always someone who would like to have a new friend, especially me! I love making friends, so I'd be happy to have a new one anytime! Oh, and also, there's always room for new ideas on the site! It's so cool when new ideas become something big and awesome, something you couldn't see the site without!

S: Finally, are you interested in any upcoming YWS events, such as getting involved with the Storybook Club, or National Poetry Writing Month (NaPoWriMo for short) in April?

F: Hehe, I'm not really good at writing poetry yet, and I'm still new to storybooks, but I'll try my best! After all, it's not really fun without a challenge, right?


As told by the FM herself, checking out different activities is a wonderful way to get yourself integrated in the world of YWS. If interested in the Storybook Club, please click this link to learn more. NaPoWriMo is just around the corner, so to get more information on that, and what events are coming up, click on this link please. Thank you!





User avatar



Gender: None specified
Points: 300
Reviews: 0
Tue Mar 05, 2019 5:05 am
View Likes
SquillsBot says...



WHY NAPO?
Image

written by alliyah < PM: >

For those who don't know, or perhaps have forgotten to turn their calendar pages from February... we are just one month away from National Poetry Writing Month or NaPo, which happens every April. National Poetry Writing Month is a month where traditionally participants try to write 30 poems, 1 every day! However, not everyone's NaPo goals are the same - and people are welcome to participate at any level. For the month of March you'll see different workshops and poetry activities around the site to start getting people ready for NaPo. On the Squills side of things I'm going to be asking different users why they decided to do NaPo, to get a better idea of how NaPo is experienced by different people and maybe inspire a few readers to tackle it themselves this year! For our first entry in the "Why NaPo" series, I interviewed one of the Squills editors, @fraey, who completed their first NaPo on YWS last year.

alliyah: Hi fraey! So, why did you first decide to do NaPo?


fraey: I don't remember when I first heard about NaPo - probably a couple of years ago on a thread describing that and NaNo at the same time, but I was certainly interested in doing something like a poetry writing challenge. Thus, last year, I had been getting active again on here, and lo and behold, Inspo for NaPo came around, which sparked my interest, and I couldn't help myself from trying it out.

a: What was the most challenging part?


f: I think getting a theme and sticking to that theme is the most challenging part. It's a whole lot of fun to think of a fun title for your poetry thread, but the whole aspect of thinking about something else besides "your life" or "daily pictures" can be very difficult and proved to be hard for me to really figure out. I stuck with "life" pretty much, but did get some nice poems out of it.

a: What did you enjoy the most?


f: I enjoyed so many aspects of NaPo. Seeing all sorts of users that made their threads and started organizing their ideas got me super excited even before April started. Having a lot of write-ins and overall get-togethers sparked a nice sense of community even with the expansive one that is YWS overall. In addition, the fact that we could read and comment on other users' poems was a lot of fun as well.

a: I know you're one of the people that actually surpassed the 30 poem goal (congrats by the way)! Do you have a favorite poem from your NaPo project last year?


f: Thank you! Going in, I was not expecting for me to get to thirty. Looking back at my project, I think my favorite one might be traditions and memories mostly because I really liked developing this little scene of the past meeting the present. I had a lot of fun trying to come up with metaphors in that poem.

a: Would you encourage people to try NaPo if they haven't before and why? Any advice for first time NaPo writers?


f: I would totally recommend people to at least try NaPo, regardless of whether or not they feel like a poet. Writing 30 poems in a month isn't that overall crazy - they can write them as they go, which is something I surely did as I wrote mine the first half of April. It's a whole lot of fun, and can really get the brain working in different ways, trying to think of different ways of saying the same thing. (Potentially.)

My advice for first time NaPo go-ers is to try to have a chunk of time every day for you to at least type up your poems, if not write them entirely. Also, always have some sort of writing utensil on you - even if you can't write a full-fledged poem at any given moment, it doesn't hurt to have a way of noting a line that appears in your head.

Here's to an amazing NaPo!


Thanks for sharing your experience fraey! You can check out fraey's writing from last year on their thread, my hopes are as strong as bubbles . You'll find a lot of variety in fraey's poems, and I look forward to reading their new set this year.

If you'd like to share why you have done NaPo in the past, or why you're going for it this year, you can join in the discussion with the hashtag "#WhyNaPo" or bring your comments over at my Author's Page .





User avatar



Gender: None specified
Points: 300
Reviews: 0
Tue Mar 05, 2019 5:07 am
View Likes
SquillsBot says...



QUEER VOICES: A JOURNEY TO STORIES WORTH TELLING: VOLUME THREE
Image
written by Cloudkid< PM: >

"We invited you to Pride when it was a protest and you didn't come; now that it's a party, you seem to have invited yourselves."

This Queer Voices article is going to be a bit different. Instead of discussing something literature related, I want to bring your attention to something in the media: Ariana Grande headlining Manchester Pride.

Because that's bad for a few reasons.

First of all, these means that Manchester Pride is now selling tickets (£65 for a weekend pass, £200 for a VIP weekend pass) to an event that is usually free of charge. On top of making the pride event 18 and up, this makes Manchester Pride inaccessible both to underage people and those who can't afford tickets. For an event that is supposed to be a safe space for lgbt people, restricting access to the event by these means kind of defeats the purpose.

In the same vein, it's been talked about online about how people who are explicitly homophobic/transphobic are buying tickets to Pride just to see Ariana Grande. Homophobes/transphobes are violating lgbt safe spaces just to see an artist. Of course this puts lgbt people at risk, but it also diverts the purpose of pride.

As well, Manchester Pride could have chosen an artist that is actually lgbt to headline their festival. Troye Sivan, Hayley Kiyoko, Halsey and more are all prime choices of queer artists that could have been a better choice.

Pride over the years has devolved from celebrating lgbt identities into a party/festival that seemingly anyone can be invited to. I'm not saying that non-lgbt people can't attend pride, but we forget the original purpose of pride: to fight back against police brutality against gay and trans people, to celebrate Stonewall, to offer a safe refuge for those that can't be themselves in the world without criticism and threats to their safety. Pride first and foremost has been and should always be about protecting and celebrating lgbt folk that have had to fight for their right to exist as they are and love as they are. To turn it into another music festival, when already so many music festivals exist, is to once again co-opt something meant for the lgbt community and strip vulnerable people of what could be their only safe space.

I am extremely disappointed in how the message of pride has been diluted for the sense of sensationalism and fame. Ariana Grande is an already well-known artist that has opportunities everywhere; to take this opportunity away from lgbt artists and, in turn, promote the dismantlement of the true meaning of pride is something that a true ally (as she claims to be) would be sensible not to do.

Once again, non-lgbt people have taken away the voices of our community. They have invaded our spaces, diluted the meaning of our events, taken opportunities from us and have pushed us aside. If you are not lgbt, pride is not for you. It certainly and especially isn't just another concert. The world already is your space; please let lgbt people have ours.





User avatar



Gender: None specified
Points: 300
Reviews: 0
Tue Mar 05, 2019 5:07 am
View Likes
SquillsBot says...



CLUB COVERAGE: THE ROLEPLAY GEEKS
Image
written by neptune< PM: >

I’m sure you’ve heard of the club - created by @Featherstone, The Roleplay Geeks club has active members that roleplay together 24/7!

With a whopping 100 subscribers, the Roleplay Geeks has definitely grown since it first was created back in December of 2016. You’ll often find the Roleplay Geeks on the “recent activity” page of the clubs tab. Members of the club can create the start of a new roleplay, and others can join in with their own characters! It’s an inclusive, collaborative club that exercises writing.

In the club’s “forums”, you’ll find lots of different ongoing roleplays that (unless otherwise specified) are open to anyone! You can organize a roleplay to have a specific number of people, too. The Roleplay Geeks is the perfect place to unleash your inner writer with other fellow writers!



I'd say it's a great place to learn how to roleplay and find people like you, but you'd have to be willing to receive A LOT of notifications on occasion. A lot of different genres are accepted, as well. There's fantasy, sci fi, realistic, and lots of just throwing characters together to see what happens.


@RavenLord (Admin)

Roleplaying is when you take your character and set them in a story/setting. From there, you write with others and see where your characters go - as a way to develop your characters.

The club is inclusive to many different genres - Star Wars roleplays , high school roleplays , and more. So when it comes to ideas, if you’re lost, you’re sure to find one here. (Or, if you have a lot of ideas, you can share them with your club-mates!)



I like roleplaying because I can improve my characters.


@AlexOfLight (Officer)

Along with being lots of fun, roleplaying also allows you to learn more about your writing and enhance it overall. By roleplaying, you can work with improving descriptions, dialogue, and personalities of a character.

As someone who has never roleplayed before, I was curious as to what advice an experienced roleplayer would give to an inexperienced one - this is what AlexOfLight said:



To not control other people's characters, to have fun, and to put the characters in the most random and craziest situations.



Roleplaying is for the sole purpose of having fun and exercising writing skills with your characters, and that’s exactly what the Roleplay Geeks was created for! Not only that, but you might even make new friends with fellow roleplayers. Remember to check out their club here !

What club would you like featured next week? Let me know on my Author Page !





User avatar



Gender: None specified
Points: 300
Reviews: 0
Tue Mar 05, 2019 5:10 am
View Likes
SquillsBot says...



SOME SUPER SERIOUS BUSINESS
Image

Written by LadyBird < PM: >

Image





User avatar



Gender: None specified
Points: 300
Reviews: 0
Tue Mar 05, 2019 5:10 am
View Likes
SquillsBot says...



POETRY PERSPECTIVE: THE SUSPICIOUS READER - PART 2
Image

written by alliyah < PM: >

Last week I discussed this concept of the "Suspicious Reader" the type of poetry reader who looks for rules that have been broken rather than new ideas invented, and who assumes that unconventional or complicated techniques are mistakes rather than intentional author choices. This week we're going to discuss, what you as the poet can do in order to write with the Suspicious Reader in mind - to minimize the amount of people getting distracted by your poetic choices, and maximize readers taking your piece seriously.

First Impressions: Title
The title is the first impression the reader makes of the author. In a split second the reader will look at the formatting and title and decide "this author knows what they're talking about" or "this person is an amateur". To that end, although you might be doing some interesting exciting things in your poetry, a title isn't the place to push boundaries. Use correct grammar, use words, don't speak in code, put an effort to put a functional and accessible title on the piece so that the reader doesn't start off on a suspicious note. It might be worth swearing in a school essay to make a literary point, but don't turn-off readers before they have a chance to read what you've written. Think of the title as your business card - it's an introduction, save the crazy stuff for the actual piece.

Consistency & Repetition
Another option for keeping your poetry accessible and putting suspicious readers at ease is to keep consistency and use some form of repetition anytime you do something really crazy in your formatting or otherwise. For instance, if you're going to try anything experimental, or modern, like uncapitalizing "i's" or substituting [brackets] for (parenthesis) if you try it multiple times the reader will be more likely to realize it's intentional, the piece will look cleaner, and the reader will be able to have multiple places of context to figure out why you made that choice. It's the same concept as figuring out what a new word means by its context clues - if I've only heard the word in a sentence once I might not be able to figure out what it means, and at worst will think you made it up. But if I hear you use the new word twice I may be able to piece together the similarities of both instances and will hopefully realize that the use was intentional. I advise repetition and consistency for any experimental poetry aspect you want to try; wacky indentation, new colors, italics, random capital letters all of it!

Layered Meaning
There's a saying when it comes to subjective arts that you can't please everyone all the time, and while that might be true in some sense, the neat thing about poetry, is you can actually write in layers - to appeal to different audiences all in the same poem. This means you can write really complicated, modern, edgy poetry - that still has appeal to the lay-reader with no poetry experience. A concrete example would be some of Shakespeare's sonnets when he purposely alters the structure of the sonnet to emphasize a certain word, or his whole subject is really about some big philosophical thought, but on its surface it looks like it's just a poem about a bouquet of roses, with some nice sounding words. This is how you write with multiple layers and different readers in mind. I wrote an article about using Layered Meaning a few weeks ago that you can check out if you'd like some more specific ideas of how to use this in your poetry. Some examples of almost universally appealing poetic topics would be nature imagery and analysis of love, devotion, or loss - even if these are not the main point of the poem, if there's one of these universally appealing topics or layers in the poem, there will be a handhold for the almost any reader to relate to it.

Instructing the Reader: Author's Notes
Another option if you're doing something really tricky is to utilize an author's note to keep the suspicious readers at bay. In my personal opinion an author's note that is preceding the work, should never say "this is a work in progress" or "I just threw this together" or anything demeaning about the work itself, because it changes the entire reading experience if it looks like the author does not take the piece seriously. But using an author's note to say that the poem is using X experimental style, or Y interesting poetic device can be a great way to offer a little education and insight into the author's intention.

Throwing all of these ideas out the window when you need to
My last advice, is to decide who you're writing to. No piece of art or writing is universally appealing, so at some point you may decide that it's okay if your work doesn't appeal to certain people, or people with certain expectations of poetry. You'll have to decide the motivation for your writing. While it's nice to just write for yourself, if you interpret poetry as a form of communication, or if you want to get published some day, it'll be necessary to decide what sorts of artistic compromises you are willing to make.

There you have it, now you may have read this article thinking, wait a second why do you keep acting like there aren't poetic rules aren't rules. What do you mean that poets don't have to capitalize their "i"s or put periods at the end of sentences? If so... you might be a suspicious reader yourself. And that is actually okay! We're going to talk about that next week. Let me know your thoughts over at my Author's Page





User avatar



Gender: None specified
Points: 300
Reviews: 0
Tue Mar 05, 2019 5:11 am
View Likes
SquillsBot says...



DISCUSSING YA NOVELS: JOHN GREEN AND THE LIKE (PART ONE)
Image
written by fraey < PM: >

Hello Squills readers. Here's to another aspect of Young Adult Fiction. I think that as readers were young, we may have flocked to certain ideas to find in books, such as a "strong protagonist" or the ever-classic "coffee shop scene" that appears in quite a few fan works, let alone published novels.

A superb example is the "amazing" John Green. Here we have an author that somehow captures that desire to suddenly travel across the United States in search of a missing girl, or a heart-breaking tale of two people falling in and out of love.

Let's talk about this for a second.

An argument that older (I'd say thirty to forty-year-olds) people like to bring up is the "cool" parts of books like these: that classic "nostalgia" feelling they get from reading of these "crazy" kids doing illegal things all in the name of "freedom" or "teenage angst" or "cancer."

A major issue I have with this idea is that what about the actual teenagers who care somewhat about school and aren't able to just drop everything and travel the country, doing absolutely nothing. What if we don't decide to do something illegal and then hide and manage not to get caught, or not waste our time thinking about how "interesting" and "unique" we are.

Admittedly, up until a few very awkward months, if not weeks ago, I viewed my own self as the "I'm special" category of young adult, the type that's "Different" in ways that make me boring instead, or weirder than not as it doesn't really matter in the end of trying to become an actual adult and getting a job.

I'm not trying to disregard troubles and issues people can have from growing up, from coming out, from moving on, but I do have problems with that being the only true trait of characters in novels. Alaska in Looking for Alaska has certain "issues" and uses them to literally make everything way more complicated than it need be, treats others like trash, and behaves generally as a bad person. She's both an unrealistic person, and an unlikeable person, as the other characters don't even try to help her in any way (which also is not realistic.)

In addition, something I must mention is how Green addresses Tourette's Syndrome in An Abundance of Katherines which is the stereotypical way of someone's inability to hold in curses, which as a hopefully more educated individual, I can say that is not only inaccurate but also damaging as that syndrome is played for laughs over any actual reason for the character to have.

To sum my current thoughts up, I think that John Green wields certain tropes that certainly draw in readers, but I'm wanting for a different type of story: anything more realistic or having better constructed characters. Next time I want to go over characters more in depth and from most, if not all of Green's books.

Until later.





User avatar



Gender: None specified
Points: 300
Reviews: 0
Tue Mar 05, 2019 5:12 am
View Likes
SquillsBot says...



POP CULTURE CORNER: SMOKEY AND THE BANDIT
Image

Written by LadyBird < PM: >

Image


If you have never seen the wonderful movie that is Smokey and the Bandit, I'm not angry. I'm just a touch disappointed.

I know that this movie is not the most popular among "young people", but even if you can't take in the happy feeling of the plot, you can at least appreciate the soundtrack. Jerry Reed is one of my favorite musicians of all time so his involvement in this movie of playing a character and contributing to the soundtrack, is a very good thing to me.

Wikipedia lists the premise for Smokey as:
The film follows Bo "Bandit" Darville and Cledus "Snowman" Snow, two bootleggers, as they attempt to illegally trasport 400 cases of Coors from Texarkana to Atlanta. During their run, they attract the attention of Sheriff Buford T. Justice (Smokey), who pursues them on their journey.


Watching Smokey and the Bandit without knowing certain pop culture significant things may decrease how much you enjoy the movie. Like these guys just randomly taking some beer from Texarkana back to Georgia is like, "Okay that's chill but why such a big deal?"

Image


Well for one, it's bootlegging.

Coors (at this point in time) has a very short timeline of being good and can easily spoil. So you're basically not supposed to be transporting the product for this distance because the trip can only be made at illegal speeds. And also, with the state of agriculture laws and highway inspection, you're really not supposed to be shipping products deemed dangerous that have a 50/50 chance of spoiling.

It's also bootlegging because Snowman and Bandit are obviously freelancers transporting alcohol of mass amounts for commercial purposes across state lines, making this a very federal case.

That's probably far more information than you want to know but there's actually far more involved in that information. If you want to look it up, this is a wikipedia spiral to invest some time in.

-

This is the Spotify link to the soundtrack for the movie which I recommend listening to in order.

The best way to listen to the soundtrack for the movie is listening to it in order because included in the soundtrack is some of the CB dialogue. So if you don't have access to the movie, you can get the complete gist of the plot just by listening to this album.

This is the movie that East Bound and Down comes from, for the reference of anyone who has ever heard it pop up in an advertisement. Or on the radio at some relative's house. Or it's another popular gas station song.

Point is that everyone has heard this song.

I know that in my short time of actually referring to myself as a musician, this album has come back to influence me in my work. It has an upbeat sound, all of the songs work together and the occassional intersection of dialogue really works.

-

Image


This wasn't a review.

This was a recommendation for one of my favorite movies.

Yes, it's troublesome.
Yes, it's southern.
Yes, it's hard to understand, sometimes.

But is it ever boring?
No, sir.

Image





User avatar



Gender: None specified
Points: 300
Reviews: 0
Tue Mar 05, 2019 5:13 am
View Likes
SquillsBot says...



SHAMELESS PLUGS
Image

written by SquillsBot < PM: >

We love to run articles and questions, but we also love to advertise for you. Let people know about your new blog, a poem or story you’re looking for reviews on, or a forum thread you’d like more traffic on through Squills’ Shameless Plugs. PM @SquillsBot with the exact formatting of your advertisement, contained in the following code.

Code: Select all
Place advertisement here. Make sure you include a title!

And now for this week's Shameless Plugs!



Review Rampage

Do you like competitions? Do you like easy ways to make extra points? Then read on!

The #ReviewRampage is a competition hosted by @ShadowVyper and @Kirkiln that is a Go-At-Your-Own-Pace review challenge. You set your own review goals and wagers, then race against time to see if you can get done in time. Or, for the more competitive spirits out there, you can also duel against your fellow Rampagers.

Go check out the Q&A Forum for more information and then head on over to the Entry Forum to claim your place as a Rampager.

Get your Rampage on!


~~~


Image


Want to be a part of Squills, the YWS newsletter? Perfect! We want you. You can find more information here, and you can apply now by sending a sample article to SquillsBot's PM.

~~~


fishsashimi welcomes you to the YWS Hunger Games Simulator! Have some fun and win some prizes! PM @fishsashimi with any questions you may have.

~~~


Calling All Knights of the Green Room!


Image


Our Building Permit for completing Challenge Four: Restoring the Library expires May 2019. The Commander is requesting all available Knights to head to the Green Room to help. To find out more, check out the Commander's post in the Great Hall .

- The Commander

~~~


Do YOU want to join
the Knights of the Green Room?


Image

The Knights of the Green Room are looking for some new recruits!

If you enjoy reviewing this may be the group for you!

For more information: KotGR Information
To declare you interest: Declare in the Great Hall .
If you have questions: Send a PM to Lieutenant Lizz (@LadyBird) or Knight Alliyah (@alliyah).


That's all folks~ Now send us yours.





User avatar



Gender: None specified
Points: 300
Reviews: 0
Tue Mar 05, 2019 5:13 am
View Likes
SquillsBot says...



SUBSCRIBERS
Image

written by SquillsBot < PM: >

Find an enspoiler-ed a list of our subscribers!
Spoiler! :

@SquillsBot@Carina@ShadowVyper@ArcticMonkey@Hannah@KingLucifer@Caesar@Veeren@megsug@StoneHeart@Skydreamer@Love@Aley@Rydia@Alpha@skorlir@KnightTeen@ChildOfNowhere@neko@Aquila90@DudeMcGuy@kayfortnight@Cole@Blackwood@manisha@fortis@Gardevite@cgirl1118@KittyCatMeow@Willard@ChocoCookie@carbonCore@Auxiira@Iggy@Blues@Paracosm@Sparkle@FireFox@Dakushau • @AlexSushiDog • @wizkid515@yubbies21@PiesAreSquared@FatCowsSis@CelticaNoir@BenFranks@TimmyJake@whitewolfpuppy@WallFlower@Magenta@BrittanyNicole@GoldFlame@Messenger@ThereseCricket@TriSARAHtops@Ventomology@Evander@WillowPaw1@Laure@TakeThatYouFiend@RoseAndThorn@Cheetah@NicoleBri@Pompadour@Zontafer@QueenOfWords@Crimsona@vluvswriting@GreenTulip@Audy@EllaBliss@eldEr@Deanie@lostthought@CesareBorgia@Kirkiln@Morrigan@AfterTheStorm • @BrumalHunter • @Arcticus@Wolfical@Pamplemousse@Sassafras@gia2505@BiscuitsLeGuin@SkyeWalker@Noelle@elysian • @Tortwag • @kingofeli@SpiritedWolfe@malachitear@GeeLyria@AdmiralKat@Clickduncake@yellow@Seraphinaxx@Pretzelstick@WritingWolf@EternalRain@Tuesday@Dragongirl@JKHatt@Lucia@donizback@Querencia@BlueSunset@artybirdy@IncohesiveScribbles@cleverclogs@MLanders@ClackFlip@PickledChrissy@racket@Lorelie@Gravity@BlueAfrica@hermione315@Steggy@willachilles@tintomara138@AmatuerWritings • @Ithaca • @TheForgottenKing@Shoneja123@Magestorrow@Mea@klennon14@fandomsNmusic@Meerkat@HolographicLadybug@Sevro@DragonWriter22@RippleGylf@amelie@Morrigun@Megrim • @outvaders • @inktopus@OreosAreLife@Saruka@rosette@PastelSlushie@Strident@darklady@Jashael@TheBlueCat@Thundahguy • @ZeldaIsShiek • @Lives4Christ24@manilla@Danni88@Elinor@fishsashimi@TheWeirdoFromBeyond@GodHatesShane@shaniac@neptune@Storybraniac@WritingPrincess@Traves@JosephHGeorge@Amabilia@Fantascifi66@paperforest@alliyah

Do you, too, want to be enspoiler-ed and receive a personal weekly notification when the Squills newsletter is posted? Shoot a PM over to SquillsBot to let him know, and you'll be pinged along with the next issue!








When I was young, I admired clever people. Now that I am old, I admire kind people.
— Abraham Heschel