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The Haunting of Faversham House DT



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Sat Jun 29, 2019 11:57 am
ScarlettFire says...



Love the post, @Chaser! Your portrayal of the professor was awesome!
"I bow to ChildOfNowhere, my one and only master."


"No one screws Yamcha but life!" - Bulma, DBZ Abridged.
  





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Mon Jul 01, 2019 12:04 pm
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Magestorrow says...



I'm definitely late to the party, but I also loved your post, @Chaser! I also love how the one defining moment Lia's had in the two posts so far was her snorting - it just seemed so in character, and made me snort when I saw that line about her reaction to Kitch's goggles.

I'm not sure I'm ready to post next, but I can go after whoever goes right after Chaser. :)
“You cannot get through a single day
without having an impact on
the world around you.

What you do makes a difference,
and you have to decide what kind
of difference you want to make.”

Jane Goodall
  





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Tue Jul 02, 2019 11:51 am
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Gravity says...



@silvermoon17 if you want to take the CP I am fine with that
And the heart is hard to translate
It has a language of its own
It talks in tongues and quiet sighs,
And prayers and proclamations

-Florence + The Machine (All This and Heaven Too)
  





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Gender: Female
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Thu Aug 01, 2019 6:21 pm
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Gravity says...



Image
And the heart is hard to translate
It has a language of its own
It talks in tongues and quiet sighs,
And prayers and proclamations

-Florence + The Machine (All This and Heaven Too)
  








"For a short space of time I remained at the window watching the pallid lightnings that played above Mont Blanc and listening to the rushing of the Arve, which pursued its noise way beneath. The same lulling sounds acted as a lullaby to my too keen sensations; when I placed my head upon my pillow, sleep crept over me; I felt it as it came and blessed the giver of oblivion."
— Mary Shelley, Frankenstein