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British and American Spellings: The Differences



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Tue Apr 07, 2015 5:55 pm
godlypopo says...



@Lava Same here :/
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Wed Apr 08, 2015 7:22 am
donizback says...



And the different pronunciation for the word "Poem"! That one caught me a year ago. xD
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Thu Apr 09, 2015 1:15 pm
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TheRobster1991 says...



I find it a little annoying when I spell a word and then Microsoft Word tells me I'm wrong and I'm pretty sure I'm not. Then I see that it's set to American English... :)
  





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Tue Apr 21, 2015 5:39 pm
FireBird99 says...



I'm half and half. I use some of the British spellings but mostly the American spelling.
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Sat Jun 24, 2017 5:37 pm
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Tuckster says...



Random fun fact (and this wasn't verified by a reliable source and in fact isn't really from a super reliable source to begin with, so feel free to correct me if I'm wrong): Webster (the guy behind Webster's dictionary who, as mentioned above, wanted to distinguish America from Britain through the language) tried to change 'tongue' to 'tung' but people were basically like "Heck naw, that too weird bro!" and that's why American and British still use tongue :)
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Sat Jun 24, 2017 7:58 pm
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Lael says...



What I found from the 'Etymology and Spelling' section of the "Tire" article on Wikipedia when I randomly looked it up one day. Quite interesting.

The etymology of "tire" is that the word is a short form of "attire", and that a wheel with a tire is a dressed wheel.

The spelling tyre does not appear until the 1840s when the English began shrink fitting railway car wheels with malleable iron. Nevertheless, traditional publishers continued using tire. The Times newspaper in Britain was still using tire as late as 1905. The spelling tyre began to be commonly used in the 19th century for pneumatic tires in the UK. The 1911 edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica states that "[t]he spelling 'tyre' is not now accepted by the best English authorities, and is unrecognized in the US", while Fowler's Modern English Usage of 1926 says that "there is nothing to be said for 'tyre', which is etymologically wrong, as well as needlessly divergent from our own [sc. British] older & the present American usage". However, over the course of the 20th century, tyre became established as the standard British spelling.


Here's the link if you want to check it out:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tire#Etym ... d_spelling
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Thu Jun 29, 2017 8:55 am
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godlypopo says...



Thank you @Lael and @MJTucker for your interesting inputs! I'm surprised you found this thread buried into the depths of 2015. But, nonetheless, thank you for taking time to add to the historical knowledge of the forum :D
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