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Humanities Chapter One Reflection

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Fri May 15, 2009 5:26 pm
Monki says...



[This was the "prompt", so to speak: 'Listen to the excerpt from Tchaikovsky's "1812 Overture", track 1 on your CD. The famous (and, in some minds, vastly overdone) finale of the piece represents pure Dionysianism in music. After listening, can you tell why?']

[My response:]

Chapter One Reflection

After listening to the piece, "1812 Overture", it is clearly understood as to why it is considered to represent pure Dionysianism. Dionysianism is defined as pertaining to a lack of order or structure, signifying passion and creativity, and even used to describe impulsive characteristics of art, society, or an individual.

It's quite obvious that in comparison to the beginning of the piece, the finale seems extremely impulsive and spontaneous. It goes from a slower, softer tone in the beginning, to an increasingly loud and amazingly overdone ending.

Although the end of the piece is considered to represent Dionysianism, the beginning of the piece most definitely represents Apollonianism. Apollonianism relates to being rational, ordered, and refers to the more self-disciplined aspects of human nature, whereas Dionysianism is the complete opposite; it is the side of the human personality that is totally dominated by intuition, emotion, and freedom from limits. This piece is a perfect representation of the two terms.

The German philosopher, Friedrich Nietzsche, had chosen the two opposing terms because Dionysus was the God of such things as spontaneity and renewal - the vibrant energy of the earth, while Apollo was the God of the sun - this being light and truth. He believed that the goal was to achieve a balance of the two forces. "1812 Overture" seems to offer this balance with the beginning being the epitome of Apollonianism, and the finale proving to be an incomparable example of Dionysianism.
Tom Riddle: "You read my diary?"
Harry Potter: "At first, I did not know it was your diary. I thought it was a very sad, handwritten book."




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Fri May 15, 2009 9:27 pm
Rosey Unicorn says...



It's quite obvious that in comparison to the beginning of the piece,


"Obvious" is a dangerous word to use in an essay. It might be obvious to you but not to the rest of us. ;)

the beginning of the piece most definitely represents Apollonianism.


"Most definitely" falls under the same camp as "obvious." ^_^

it is the side of the human personality that is totally dominated by intuition,


"Totally" sounds a lot like teen-speak, which you probably want to avoid.

Dionysus was the God of such things as spontaneity and renewal - the vibrant energy of the earth, while Apollo was the God of the sun - this being light and truth.


With the dashes the way they are, I had a hard time placing the definitions. I'd replace them with colons.

So, after writing a bunch of essays where the teacher hasn't read/listened too what I'm writing about, this might be completely irrelevant but here goes:

I found that there weren't quiet enough examples to back up the conclusions you draw. It can be hard with a piece of music, but I'd try to mention more things that make it one style or the other. Especially on Apollonianism, and how it ties into the beginning.

Hope that helps!

~Rosey
A writer is a world trapped in a person— Victor Hugo

#TNT




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Sat May 16, 2009 12:06 am
Monki says...



:] Thank you very mucho! <3 I'll edit this.
Tom Riddle: "You read my diary?"
Harry Potter: "At first, I did not know it was your diary. I thought it was a very sad, handwritten book."