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Should Creationism be taught in schools?

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Tue Feb 14, 2012 3:30 pm
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misstoria says...



Since there is a law in the works allowing creationism to be taught in school I was wondering what your opinions are? Is creationism and evolution that different? What are your opinions, how did we come to be?
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Tue Feb 14, 2012 3:42 pm
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Karzkin says...



Yes it should. In Religion class.
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Tue Feb 14, 2012 4:13 pm
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Paracosm says...



It should be offered as an elective. That way folks can opt out if they choose to.
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Tue Feb 14, 2012 7:19 pm
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tr3x says...



Not in a biology or science class, that would be folly. Sure, in a religion class, or a Christian club, go right ahead.
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Tue Feb 14, 2012 8:20 pm
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Cole says...



I'm with everyone here so far. It should not be taught in a biology class or a science class. And it should be a choice to take the class, such as an elective. I can see maybe having all schools offer a Bible study class (my school does) or a class on religion, but I don't think Creationism should be brought into the primary curriculum.

I'm a Christian (I'm one of the biggest Jesus freaks I know) and I don't even believe in Creationism. I don't think it would be right to make it a mandatory class. It goes against the separation of church and state.
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Tue Feb 14, 2012 9:15 pm
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Snoink says...



They are very different. Very, very different.

For one? Science is never an absolute.
Creationism is, by definition, absolute.

So, by saying that they are interchangeable is a no-no in the first place, because of that huge little thing. It would be kind of like saying that a rock is the same as play-doh. Not true!

And you can see this kind of misunderstanding all the time if you look at both sides. In fact! I found this quote, that pretty much sums it up:

The authors use phrases such as "may have been" and "possibly arose"--hardly the definitive declarations one should use to document the "fact" of evolution. [Source]


But, science is hardly a fact. In fact, one of my professors, when I said that it is true, she stopped me and told me to alter my word choice -- absolute truth is impossible in science.

Also? The science behind creationism kind of sucks. I mean, I believe that God created the universe and created man in His own image, etc. I am Christian. That's kind of what Christians have to believe. But... wow. Some of the ideas that creationists have are pretty... interesting. I think my favorite article is they have is that the tyrannosaurus rex has teeth that are equivalent to the panda bear.

Spoiler! :
Image

Image

I bet you don't know which is which!


So, I think that, if you were to teach creationism in school, you would completely mess up their science education. I mean... if it were just a matter of saying, "Oh, and God prompted this world to be created!" then that would be one thing. But, in order to justify creation, you have to hide a lot of scientific information. A lot. Like, my sister is a geophysicist, and so to annoy her, I just tell her about the methodologies that they use about radiometric dating, and so on while I watch her cringe. And I go on the creationist websites to giggle about their biology stuff, because that's my field of study. But, if you actually taught this stuff as true in high school? BAM. What you know about science is fundamentally flawed, and you have to unlearn everything you learned in order to relearn science at a higher level.

And, sure, some of the creationism websites make it seem reasonable, but they do this by hiding facts. For instance, I've actually seen the following used for debates: The Bible and Radiometric dating (The Problem with Carbon 14 and other dating methods). Of course, this site neglects to mention that everything that they submitted for carbon-14 dating is outside the realm of what can be reasonably found. You need a sample that is dead and has been dead for a range of about 250--50,000 years.

And then there is this, which looks a little more scientific... but really, it's not: Does C14 disprove the bible? First of all, ye of little faith, the title automatically puts the reader on the offensive. If C14 is true, then the whole of the bible must be false. So, when Jesus tells you to love God and love thy neighbor? And when He tells you that He loves you unconditionally? Yeah. That's all wrong.

Next... um... it seems like they think that radiometric dating is only C14? It's not. Really, it's not. Trust me on this. I can already hear my sister's brain cells screaming in pain.

Next, they say that the other scientific papers are biased toward evolution, etc., etc. Okay. I can take that criticism. But then, all their papers that they cite are specifically funded by creationist donors. Suuuuure. That's not biased at all. (I smell... hypocrisy!)

So yeah. I am of the opinion that creationism, as it is today, should not be taught in schools at ALL. Mind you... I'm okay with Genesis being taught in schools. Creation stories are awesome. Also, if you're in a religious school, I think it would be neat to have a discussion on the various ways to look at Creation, where you bring in Maimonides, St. Augustine, St. Basil, Ludwig Ott, and others. It would be neat and I think it would fit in quite nicely in a religious school! But, the pseudo-science part? No. It will misguide people and make their future science careers hell.
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Tue Feb 14, 2012 10:41 pm
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shiney1 says...



I believe that it should be offered as course that you can take along with science classes, like an elective, but instead of being just one class for one semester or year it would branch off and go more in-depth as you progress through high school or college, like language and health.

I wish my school offered a creationism course.
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Wed Feb 15, 2012 12:41 am
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Pigeon says...



Creationism should be taught in religion classes, so long as the creation stories of at least the other major religions are also taught. Otherwise it hardly seems fair.
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parigirle says...



Although I have no interest in creationism, I see no problem with it being taught in the context of a religion class. However, I think it should be an elective - I go to a Catholic school as there aren't any other good high schools in my area, and no one here likes being forced to take religion. I also think it should be balanced with a discussion of evolution in a scientific context, especially now that most sects of religion are coming around to accept evolution as scientific fact.

Creationism should be taught in religion classes, so long as the creation stories of at least the other major religions are also taught. Otherwise it hardly seems fair.

This is one problem with creationism; it ultimately comes down to Christianity. If I'm remembering correctly from my world religion class last semester, Christianity, Judaism, and Islam all share the Genesis creation story. Hinduism does have creationism, but then look at Buddhism - Siddhartha Gautauma said that there was no point in bothering with questions that had no answers, and so you don't see a lot of creationism with Buddhism. No matter how hard you try to discuss all the major religions, creationism will come down to Christianity in the end.




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Wed Feb 15, 2012 4:12 am
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Snoink says...



Plus, creationism is very different from creation stories. Very different.
Ubi caritas est vera, Deus ibi est.

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Wed Feb 15, 2012 1:24 pm
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Cole says...



It doesn't have to come down to Christianity. Judaism, Mormonism, and Islam basically share the same creation story, prophets, ethics, and deity as Christianity. So, it would come down to the Abrahamic faiths, probably.
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Wed Feb 15, 2012 1:29 pm
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misstoria says...



What about teaching creationism in science class? Evolution in it's self is considered a theory, how can it be taught as a fact? How is there any difference in teaching creationism and evolution? They both have supporting evidence.
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Wed Feb 15, 2012 1:49 pm
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Cole says...



Evolution is quite nearly a scientific fact. It is really more than just a theory.
Last edited by Cole on Wed Feb 15, 2012 1:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Wed Feb 15, 2012 1:53 pm
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Cole says...



Also, I will agree with you that there is evidence for a Creator. (The existence of evolution does not mean there is no Creator. I believe in both.) But the reason creationism cannot be taught in a science class is due to the separation of church and state.
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~Hosea 6:3~
ונדעה נרדפה לדעת את יהוה כשחר נכון מצאו ויבוא כגשם לנו כמלקוש יורה ארץ׃




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Wed Feb 15, 2012 2:08 pm
misstoria says...



I understand the separation of church and state but how is it that teaching about religion is a requirement for most middle / high school history classes, but not creationism.
You are more than the choices that you've made, you are more than the sum of your past mistakes. You are more than the problems you create, You'v been remade.

http://writemeaway.blogspot.com/