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Russian Political Awakening

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Sun Dec 11, 2011 10:10 pm
tr3x says...



Will it amount to anything?
A lie can run around the world before the truth has got its boots on.
- Terry Pratchett

Si non confectus, non recifiat - If it ain't broken, don't fix it.




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Sun Dec 11, 2011 10:26 pm
inkwell says...



Interestingly enough, this just came out. I think there is a serious shift in the Russian people.

"The most incomprehensible thing about the world is that it is comprehensible." — Einstein




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Sun Dec 11, 2011 10:36 pm
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tr3x says...



Doesn't this just highlight the fact that Russia is, and will continue to be ruled by an ex-KGB agent who quells opposition with an iron fist? See also the recent ballot box stuffings.
A lie can run around the world before the truth has got its boots on.
- Terry Pratchett

Si non confectus, non recifiat - If it ain't broken, don't fix it.




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185 Reviews


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Points: 1096
Reviews: 185
Sun Dec 11, 2011 11:10 pm
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inkwell says...



Exactly. But my point is that the film's release seems to be a sign of public awareness growing. Not to mention the protests. If it amounts to anything more is really a moot question at this point, don't you think?
"The most incomprehensible thing about the world is that it is comprehensible." — Einstein




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Tue Dec 13, 2011 11:23 pm
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tr3x says...



Well, I was rather hoping for some speculation. :/
A lie can run around the world before the truth has got its boots on.
- Terry Pratchett

Si non confectus, non recifiat - If it ain't broken, don't fix it.




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Tue Dec 13, 2011 11:44 pm
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Blink says...



If you're interested in a relevant history book, have a read of Geoffrey Hosking's "Russia: People and Empire: 1552-1917" - his argument is effectively that the Russian people never had an opportunity to develop a sense of national consciousness and awareness. Tsars and Soviets constantly repressed its culture in order to expand and consolidate the imperial state.

The reason I'm mentioning this is because of how he then leads to question the position of Russia today. Thrown into a failed capitalism and yet something of a democratic constitution, it's no surprise that people looked to Putin as the fatherly figure to restore the international authority of Communism: after 1991, Russia glimpsed the West and didn't like it. However, for once, we're in a situation where the Russian state is not under military threat, and thus national consciousness has a chance to prosper. Perhaps the increasing success of capitalism is having an effect too - why go back to the days of Krushchev's space and nuclear supremacy when they've got both economic and political freedom today?

That is why I think Putin and his cronies are losing support. It's not fair to say that the Russians hate democracy and economic liberty (a phrase which is, incidentally, something of a euphemism). And so I think, and hope, that Putin will disappear...

To answer the question: vive la revolution! Okay, so these protests are something of a trend rather than a sudden emergence of nationalism and democracy and whatever.
"A man's face is his autobiography. A woman's face is her work of fiction." ~ Oscar Wilde