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The New Canadian Conservative Majority

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Wed May 04, 2011 1:51 am
Lavvie says...



So, for those who aren't yet informed, Canada just had a federal election. We have been in a minority for ages and this election was the fourth in seven years. In the end, the Conservatives, led by Stephen Harper, won out with 165 seats (out of 308 in total) and the NDP (New Democratic Party and led by Jack Layton) became the Official Opposition with 105 seats, I think. It is the first time the NDP have been the Official Opposition. The Liberals, who were the previous Offical Opp. felt their party crumble around them. Their leader, Michael Ignatieff, was forced to resign just like Gilles Duceppe from the Bloc Quebecois who were destroyed by the NDP in Quebec.

So now we have a Conservative majority government meaning the Conservatives can stay in power for four years and do pretty much all they wish while the NDP keep a close eye on them.

Nonetheless, this election has roused some dark anger against the Conservatives who broadcast heartless advertisements about the fellow parties. Many people claim we will lose our nationality because the Conservatives support more trade with the USA. But the Conservatives are good with the economy: Canada had one of the best recession recoveries thanks to them.

Still, feelings are mixed. Thoughts?




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Wed May 04, 2011 6:16 am
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Nate says...



I don't follow Canadian politics much, but the outcome was definitely surprising. I did think Harper would finally get his majority, but the near-demolition of the Liberals and the complete obliteration (at the federal level at least) of the BQ was surprising. It is not often you see the leader of a major political party (much less, two major political parties) lose their seat in an election.

From an American perspective, it'll be interesting to see what happens next. I certainly hope Harper pushes for closer economic ties between the United States and Canada as that would strongly benefit both countries, but unfortunately I do not believe that is of Canada's choosing. I wish it were because then I wouldn't have to take my passport to see Niagara Falls, which is outrageously stupid (to be clear, you only need your passport to enter America; going into Canada, I think you just need a photo ID).

It'll also be interesting to see what happens next in Canada. Again from an American perspective, the difference between Canada's Conservatives and Liberals seemed to be small. But the difference between the Conservatives and the NDP is huge.
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Wed May 04, 2011 6:38 am
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Lavvie says...



It's interesting learning about what someone from the States thinks. Not many people do follow Canadian politics: I've often heard non-Canadians say things like, "Oh, it's the Canadian elections, whatever. Not that important." Of course I do recognize the fact that Canada is most definitely not as influential as the US is, but that's sure what Harper is striving for.

To be blunt, I despise the Conservatives. I don't think Harper is incompetent--no, he knows what he's doing out there in Ottawa-- but I don't think he's right for Canada. Canada has always been known as the Free Country, or roughly along those lines, however Mr. Harper is pro-life and believes that abortion should be illegal and that homosexual marriage should be as well. If you support these stances, I respect those decisions whether or not I disagree with them. Everyone's preference, eh? Anyway, personally, I think that Canada could do really well with the NDP because:

a) They've never been in power.
b) They're all for a greater education and better health care.
c) They're well-rounded.

In regards to c), I recognize that that may be a biased statement, but what I'm trying to make clear is that, however left they are on the political spectrum, they do have plans for the economy. We're in debt and the Conservatives may be able to help us be rid of that, but Harper alsowants to buy some fighter planes that are in a price range of about 1-5 million dollars CAD. First off, that won't help us much money-wise and secondly, what use does Canada have for fighter jets? We don't go to war often and we aren't extremely active in the Middle-East at the present moment.

My thoughts only.

I'm sure the Liberals will make a comeback, but I'm not entirely sure about the Bloc Quebecois. They're in the minority for party votes simply because not many people support the idea that Quebec should be its proper nation. I know loads of Francophones where I am and mostly they voted NDP. The BQ could come back, but not for awhile.

As one Tweeter said, according to the CBC radio news, "Quebec, you look hot in orange." Orange being the colour of the NDP.




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Wed May 04, 2011 2:34 pm
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tr3x says...



The election results surprised us all, to be sure. I myself support the Libs, but Ignatieff is too egotistical for my liking. Layton, while charismatic, belongs to a party that I don't fully support on all issues. The Tories have a strong economic policy, but their wiretapping-the-Internet policy makes me want to strangle something. NDP have a great electronic policy, supporting net neutrality and pushing to make it part of the constitution, but I disagree with their defence policies. Overall, we have no perfect party. They are either corporate sell outs, leftist pacifists (not necessarily a bad thing), or shoved into the background like the Libs were.
A lie can run around the world before the truth has got its boots on.
- Terry Pratchett

Si non confectus, non recifiat - If it ain't broken, don't fix it.




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Wed May 04, 2011 2:36 pm
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Kamas says...



I'm not shocked by the near obliteration of the BQ. The support the NDP came a lot from Quebec, because they're in the same ideology without the separatist aspect. I'm not a fan of any of the would be leaders, and I don't think any of them would be best for Canada, NDP would be the unhealthiest for Canada. Layton seems like a wonderful, charismatic man but his old socialist approach leaves me skeptical.

We're coming out of a recession and still need to ground ourselves, yet Layton planned to raise taxes on businesses by $50 billion. I'm not pleased to see an NDP jump, and would much rather have a Conservative minority then an NDP government.
Harper has done well for Canada considering the circumstances, though he's rather closed in on Canada. Harper needs a chance with a majority, now that we're recovering. The blind raging young people frothing at the mouth about how much they hate Harper is blind judgment of a man who hasn't done all too bad of a job. While Layton's ideology will make it ever so difficult for these young people to ever be successful. It's easy for us to think "for the people" when we're not the ones who have to pay the taxes.
"Nothing is permanent in this wicked world - not even our troubles." ~ Charles Chaplin

#tnt




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Wed May 04, 2011 4:07 pm
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tr3x says...



http://shitharperdid.ca.nyud.net/
This is a pretty interesting, if biased site.
A lie can run around the world before the truth has got its boots on.
- Terry Pratchett

Si non confectus, non recifiat - If it ain't broken, don't fix it.




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Sun May 08, 2011 7:32 am
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Lavvie says...



Nice points, all. It is so interesting to see how everyone is reacting!